Psalm 28:1 Parallel Verses [⇓ See commentary ⇓]

Psalm 28:1, NIV: Of David. To you, LORD, I call; you are my Rock, do not turn a deaf ear to me. For if you remain silent, I will be like those who go down to the pit.

Psalm 28:1, ESV: Of David. To you, O LORD, I call; my rock, be not deaf to me, lest, if you be silent to me, I become like those who go down to the pit.

Psalm 28:1, KJV: {A Psalm of David.} Unto thee will I cry, O LORD my rock; be not silent to me: lest, if thou be silent to me, I become like them that go down into the pit.

Psalm 28:1, NASB: To You, LORD, I call; My rock, do not be deaf to me, For if You are silent to me, I will become like those who go down to the pit.

Psalm 28:1, NLT: A psalm of David. I pray to you, O LORD, my rock. Do not turn a deaf ear to me. For if you are silent, I might as well give up and die.

Psalm 28:1, CSB: Lord, I call to you; my rock, do not be deaf to me. If you remain silent to me, I will be like those going down to the Pit.

What does Psalm 28:1 mean? [⇑ See verse text ⇑]

David asks the Lord not to remain silent in response to his cry. In this, David seems to acknowledge that it is God's grace which rescues men, not their own actions. Without God's answer and influence, David would be no better off than those who ignored God entirely. This does not mean David lacked confidence. He refers to God as his "rock." Just as a rock is solid and strong, even so the Lord is a firm defender of the righteous and cannot be moved. He is the same yesterday, today, and forever (Hebrews 13:8).

It's possible David felt some prayer request was being delayed. Of course, God's delays are not always denials. He has promised to answer His people's prayers. However, He encourages His people to keep on asking (Luke 11:9; 18:1). Jesus taught His disciples to persevere in prayer by telling the story of a man who received a late-night guest but had no food to give him. Therefore, he went to a neighbor's house at midnight and requested three loaves. At first, the neighbor would not get up from bed and grant the request. Nevertheless, because the visitor kept on knocking, the neighbor arose and gave him whatever he needed (Luke 11:5–8). Jesus promised that the Father in heaven will answer the prayers of those who ask (Luke 11:9–10). Persistence in prayer develops patience. The delays in answering prayer are occasions when the Lord develops character in His people.