Psalm 73:2 Parallel Verses [⇓ See commentary ⇓]

Psalm 73:2, NIV: "But as for me, my feet had almost slipped; I had nearly lost my foothold."

Psalm 73:2, ESV: "But as for me, my feet had almost stumbled, my steps had nearly slipped."

Psalm 73:2, KJV: "But as for me, my feet were almost gone; my steps had well nigh slipped."

Psalm 73:2, NASB: "But as for me, my feet came close to stumbling, My steps had almost slipped."

Psalm 73:2, NLT: "But as for me, I almost lost my footing. My feet were slipping, and I was almost gone."

Psalm 73:2, CSB: "But as for me, my feet almost slipped; my steps nearly went astray."

What does Psalm 73:2 mean? [⇑ See verse text ⇑]

Though Asaph's view of God is accurate (Psalm 73:1), there was a time when he almost lost his faith. The description here is of someone struggling to keep going, on a path which has suddenly become hard. Scripture often depicts spiritual life as a path, where stumbling or falling are metaphors for sin and disaster (Psalm 17:5; Jude 1:24–25). Something challenged Asaph's faith and nearly made it collapse. His steps had almost taken him away from a correct course. After carefully considering, however (Psalm 73:16–17), he would come back to the right conclusion (Psalm 73:28).

This is something which can happen to any believer. Occasionally our limited understanding conflicts with what seems like an inconsistency on God's part. There are times when life experience does not easily agree with our belief system. These moments are like knocking someone off balance as they walk. They risk stumbling and falling as trouble throws their spiritual status into uncertainty.

The apostle Paul cautioned, "Therefore let anyone who thinks he stands take heed lest he fall" (1 Corinthians 10:12). When Job's faith was assaulted by numerous severe trials, his wife asked why he still held fast to his integrity. She urged him to curse God. But Job refused to do so. He asked whether he and she would receive good from God without also receiving calamity (Job 2:9–10). Nothing, not even hardship, should cause us to doubt that God is good (Romans 8:38–39).