Verse
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Psalm 46:1

ESV God is our refuge and strength, a very present help in trouble.
NIV For the director of music. Of the Sons of Korah. According to alamoth. A song. God is our refuge and strength, an ever-present help in trouble.
NASB God is our refuge and strength, A very ready help in trouble.
CSB For the choir director. A song of the sons of Korah. According to . God is our refuge and strength, a helper who is always found in times of trouble.
NLT God is our refuge and strength, always ready to help in times of trouble.
KJV To the chief Musician for the sons of Korah, A Song upon Alamoth. God is our refuge and strength, a very present help in trouble.
NKJV {To the Chief Musician. A Psalm of the sons of Korah. A Song for Alamoth.} God is our refuge and strength, A very present help in trouble.

What does Psalm 46:1 mean?

This psalm reflects on God's miraculous deliverance of His people but does not specify an exact event. There are many possibilities, one of which is when the Assyrians laid siege to Jerusalem and advised King Hezekiah to surrender. Rather than surrender, Hezekiah prayed, and God answered (2 Kings 18—19; 2 Chronicles 32; Isaiah 36—37). Isaiah 37:36 declares: "And the angel of the LORD went out and struck down 185,000 in the camp of the Assyrians. And when the people arose early in the morning, behold, these were all dead bodies."

The word "refuge" comes from the Hebrew root term machaceh, meaning "shelter." In modern English, "shelter" is often applied to structures providing safety from things like rain, or natural disasters, or enemy attacks. As in the Assyrian invasion, God sheltered the people of Israel. He demonstrated that He was the source of their protection.

The phrase "a very present help in trouble" also benefits from deeper study. The concept of God being "very present" could also be phrased as "clearly proven" (Deuteronomy 4:7). Past experiences, including history, show that God is worthy of our trust (Hebrews 12:1). The word "trouble" comes from a Hebrew word literally meaning a confined space. Its use here closely resembles the English expression "in a tight spot." These are moments when one feels trapped or hopeless (Psalm 9:9). Christians today may feel trapped in tight situations. Like the people of Jerusalem besieged by the Assyrians, the best course of action is to trust in the Lord to handle the situation. He has done it before, and He can do it again.
Expand
Expand
Expand
What is the Gospel?
Download the app: