Psalm 30:11 Parallel Verses [⇓ See commentary ⇓]

Psalm 30:11, NIV: You turned my wailing into dancing; you removed my sackcloth and clothed me with joy,

Psalm 30:11, ESV: You have turned for me my mourning into dancing; you have loosed my sackcloth and clothed me with gladness,

Psalm 30:11, KJV: Thou hast turned for me my mourning into dancing: thou hast put off my sackcloth, and girded me with gladness;

Psalm 30:11, NASB: You have turned my mourning into dancing for me; You have untied my sackcloth and encircled me with joy,

Psalm 30:11, NLT: You have turned my mourning into joyful dancing. You have taken away my clothes of mourning and clothed me with joy,

Psalm 30:11, CSB: You turned my lament into dancing; you removed my sackcloth and clothed me with gladness,

What does Psalm 30:11 mean? [⇑ See verse text ⇑]

David credits the Lord with ending his sadness and restoring his joy. This implies that God granted David's prior requests for forgiveness (Psalm 30:8–10) for his presumptuous arrogance (Psalm 30:1–7).

Sackcloth was a rough, loose garment made of goat's hair. The texture is somewhat like burlap, another material known for its rough texture. Sackcloth, like burlap, was often used to make coarse bags. Wearing such cloth was a visual sign of mourning. The uncomfortable experience was also a constant reminder of the tragic event, much as fasting produces a persistent feeling—hunger—keeping the person's mind on the reason for the fast. Jacob put on sackcloth and mourned when he believed his son Joseph had been devoured by a ferocious animal (Genesis 37:33–34). David had worn sackcloth when the Lord disciplined him, but forgiveness and restoration had given way to rejoicing.

Embracing forgiveness results in a profound change in our attitude. The story of the Prodigal Son illustrates what happens when a wayward child of God repents and receives forgiveness. The hedonistic son turned from his sinful manner of life and returned to his father. His father promptly forgave him; great rejoicing followed (Luke 15:11–24). A Christian may rebel and sow his wild oats, but he experiences conviction of sin and unhappiness until he turns from his sin and receives forgiveness.