Genesis 24:56 Parallel Verses [⇓ See commentary ⇓]

Genesis 24:56, NIV: "But he said to them, 'Do not detain me, now that the LORD has granted success to my journey. Send me on my way so I may go to my master.'"

Genesis 24:56, ESV: "But he said to them, “Do not delay me, since the LORD has prospered my way. Send me away that I may go to my master.”"

Genesis 24:56, KJV: "And he said unto them, Hinder me not, seeing the LORD hath prospered my way; send me away that I may go to my master."

Genesis 24:56, NASB: "However, he said to them, 'Do not delay me, since the LORD has prospered my way. Send me away so that I may go to my master.'"

Genesis 24:56, NLT: "But he said, 'Don't delay me. The LORD has made my mission successful; now send me back so I can return to my master.'"

Genesis 24:56, CSB: "But he responded to them, "Do not delay me, since the LORD has made my journey a success. Send me away so that I may go to my master.""

What does Genesis 24:56 mean? [⇑ See verse text ⇑]

Why was Abraham's servant eager to leave with Rebekah so quickly after her family agreed to the marriage proposal? They had requested, very reasonably, 10 days or so delay before sending her off to be married in a strange land.

Abraham's servant insisted on not being delayed. His reason is hard to understand: "since the Lord has prospered my way." Did the servant feel that delaying their departure would somehow dishonor the success God had granted to him? Perhaps he was concerned that, given time to think about their agreement, Rebekah's family might change their mind. He might have assumed that, since God had granted his request to find the right woman so quickly, that God also intended this mission to be completed as soon as possible.

One more possibility is that the servant was concerned Abraham might die before he could get back with this wife for Isaac. Abraham's words to the servant at the beginning of this chapter did sound like those of a dying man. Though Abraham went on to live several more decades, perhaps his health status was questionable for a season. And, lest we forget, Abraham is more than 130 years old at this point (Genesis 17:17; 21:5; 23:1–2).

In any case, the servant wants to leave—immediately!