Genesis 24:29 Parallel Verses [⇓ See commentary ⇓]

Genesis 24:29, NIV: "Now Rebekah had a brother named Laban, and he hurried out to the man at the spring."

Genesis 24:29, ESV: "Rebekah had a brother whose name was Laban. Laban ran out toward the man, to the spring."

Genesis 24:29, KJV: "And Rebekah had a brother, and his name was Laban: and Laban ran out unto the man, unto the well."

Genesis 24:29, NASB: "Now Rebekah had a brother whose name was Laban; and Laban ran outside to the man at the spring."

Genesis 24:29, NLT: "Now Rebekah had a brother named Laban, who ran out to meet the man at the spring."

Genesis 24:29, CSB: "Now Rebekah had a brother named Laban, and Laban ran out to the man at the spring."

What does Genesis 24:29 mean? [⇑ See verse text ⇑]

Rebekah has been speaking with a traveler from the land of Canaan. This man is a servant of Abraham, on a mission to find a wife for Abraham's son, Isaac (Genesis 24:3–4). Rebekah arrived as the man was praying for God to send him a sign (Genesis 24:12–14), and she unknowingly fulfilled that very request (Genesis 24:18–19). The man gave her expensive gifts, and asked if her family was able to accommodate the traveling group for the night (Genesis 24:22–25).

Suddenly a new character—and a complication—bursts onto the scene of this unfolding drama. Rebekah had run home to tell the news about this stranger, his wealth, his connection to the family, and his interest in staying with them (Genesis 24:28). Now her brother Laban runs back to the spring, the well, where Abraham's servant remains waiting.

As Rebekah's brother, Laban will play a role in the decision of whether to accept the coming marriage proposal for Rebekah and to allow her to travel and settle away from the family. He will also play a role later in Genesis when Jacob, the son of Rebekah and Isaac, comes to him looking for a wife of his own (Genesis 29). The role of brothers, or fathers, in accepting marriage proposals, was common in that time; this was part of why Abraham had attempted to pretend that he was only Sarah's brother in years past (Genesis 12:11–13; Genesis 20:2).