Genesis 24:47 Parallel Verses [⇓ See commentary ⇓]

Genesis 24:47, NIV: "I asked her, 'Whose daughter are you?' 'She said, 'The daughter of Bethuel son of Nahor, whom Milkah bore to him.' 'Then I put the ring in her nose and the bracelets on her arms,"

Genesis 24:47, ESV: "Then I asked her, ‘Whose daughter are you?’ She said, ‘The daughter of Bethuel, Nahor’s son, whom Milcah bore to him.’ So I put the ring on her nose and the bracelets on her arms."

Genesis 24:47, KJV: "And I asked her, and said, Whose daughter art thou? And she said, The daughter of Bethuel, Nahor's son, whom Milcah bare unto him: and I put the earring upon her face, and the bracelets upon her hands."

Genesis 24:47, NASB: "Then I asked her, and said, ‘Whose daughter are you?’ And she said, ‘The daughter of Bethuel, Nahor’s son, whom Milcah bore to him’; and I put the ring on her nose, and the bracelets on her wrists."

Genesis 24:47, NLT: "'Then I asked, 'Whose daughter are you?' She replied, 'I am the daughter of Bethuel, and my grandparents are Nahor and Milcah.' So I put the ring on her nose, and the bracelets on her wrists."

Genesis 24:47, CSB: "Then I asked her, 'Whose daughter are you?' She responded, 'The daughter of Bethuel son of Nahor, whom Milcah bore to him.' So I put the ring on her nose and the bracelets on her wrists."

What does Genesis 24:47 mean? [⇑ See verse text ⇑]

Abraham's servant now describes the final bit of information he learned from Rebekah during their encounter at the spring earlier that day. This in the information that fully convinced him God had led him straight to Rebekah as the woman meant to marry Isaac.

The servant had asked Rebekah who her father was. She answered with names the servant knew: Her father was Bethuel, the son of Nahor and Milcah. The servant could not have found any closer relatives to Abraham than these.

Interestingly, the servant describes giving Rebekah the gift of the nose ring and bracelets after asking who her father was (Genesis 24:22–24). Perhaps he simply mixed up the order or perhaps he felt that Rebekah's father and brother would feel the gifts would have been more appropriately given after knowing what family Rebekah was from. As in other instances, Scripture faithfully records the truth of what certain people said or did, without necessarily claiming those words are accurate.