Genesis 24:30 Parallel Verses [⇓ See commentary ⇓]

Genesis 24:30, NIV: "As soon as he had seen the nose ring, and the bracelets on his sister's arms, and had heard Rebekah tell what the man said to her, he went out to the man and found him standing by the camels near the spring."

Genesis 24:30, ESV: "As soon as he saw the ring and the bracelets on his sister’s arms, and heard the words of Rebekah his sister, “Thus the man spoke to me,” he went to the man. And behold, he was standing by the camels at the spring."

Genesis 24:30, KJV: "And it came to pass, when he saw the earring and bracelets upon his sister's hands, and when he heard the words of Rebekah his sister, saying, Thus spake the man unto me; that he came unto the man; and, behold, he stood by the camels at the well."

Genesis 24:30, NASB: "When he saw the ring and the bracelets on his sister’s wrists, and when he heard the words of his sister Rebekah, saying, 'This is what the man said to me,' he went to the man; and behold, he was standing by the camels at the spring."

Genesis 24:30, NLT: "He had seen the nose-ring and the bracelets on his sister's wrists, and had heard Rebekah tell what the man had said. So he rushed out to the spring, where the man was still standing beside his camels."

Genesis 24:30, CSB: "As soon as he had seen the ring and the bracelets on his sister's wrists, and when he had heard his sister Rebekah's words--"The man said this to me!"--he went to the man. He was standing there by the camels at the spring."

What does Genesis 24:30 mean? [⇑ See verse text ⇑]

Rebekah has come home to tell her family about some exciting news. A traveler gave her expensive gifts after she unknowingly served as the answer to his prayer (Genesis 24:12–23). His quest is to find a wife for Isaac, the son of his master, Abraham (Genesis 24:3–4). This news results in Rebekah's brother, Laban, coming to the well to meet the man in question.

Although Laban will eagerly offer hospitality to Abraham's servant, much as Rebekah has done, this verse gives us reasons to be wary of Laban's motives. Is he simply wanting to welcome in the messenger of a distant relative, or is he most excited by the wealth suggested by the expensive gifts given to Rebekah and her story about the ten camels? To this point, the only information Laban apparently knows is that a rich and generous man wants to stay at his home overnight. There has been no mention made, yet, that the man is seeking a bride for Isaac, back in the land of Canaan.

In any case, Laban quickly finds Abraham's servant waiting by the spring.