Genesis 24:31 Parallel Verses [⇓ See commentary ⇓]

Genesis 24:31, NIV: "Come, you who are blessed by the LORD,' he said. 'Why are you standing out here? I have prepared the house and a place for the camels.'"

Genesis 24:31, ESV: "He said, “Come in, O blessed of the LORD. Why do you stand outside? For I have prepared the house and a place for the camels.”"

Genesis 24:31, KJV: "And he said, Come in, thou blessed of the LORD; wherefore standest thou without? for I have prepared the house, and room for the camels."

Genesis 24:31, NASB: "And he said, 'Come in, blessed of the LORD! Why do you stand outside, since I have prepared the house, and a place for the camels?'"

Genesis 24:31, NLT: "Laban said to him, 'Come and stay with us, you who are blessed by the LORD! Why are you standing here outside the town when I have a room all ready for you and a place prepared for the camels?'"

Genesis 24:31, CSB: "Laban said, "Come, you who are blessed by the LORD. Why are you standing out here? I have prepared the house and a place for the camels.""

What does Genesis 24:31 mean? [⇑ See verse text ⇑]

Rebekah's brother Laban, hearing her story of everything Abraham's servant had said to her and seeing the gifts that he gave to her, rushes out to the town well, or spring, and finds the servant waiting there. At this point, however, all Rebekah or Laban really know is that the man is wealthy and in search of Abraham's family. To this point, the servant has not revealed that his mission is to find a wife for Abraham's son, Isaac (Genesis 24:3–4).

Laban addresses the servant warmly, calling him the Lord's blessed one and inviting his company to come and stay at their house.

Hospitality was a critical cultural value in this era, especially among reputable people. To leave anyone, especially a relative or potential guest, without accommodation would be seen as a grave unkindness. The quickness and eagerness of Rebekah and Laban in offering hospitality to Abraham's servant reminds us of Abraham's own eagerness to offer hospitality to the travelers who turned out to be the Lord and two angels in human form (Genesis 18:1–15). It reminds us, as well, of Lot's urgent hospitality to the two strangers, also angels, on Sodom's final night (Genesis 19:1–3).