Genesis 24:27 Parallel Verses [⇓ See commentary ⇓]

Genesis 24:27, NIV: "saying, 'Praise be to the LORD, the God of my master Abraham, who has not abandoned his kindness and faithfulness to my master. As for me, the LORD has led me on the journey to the house of my master's relatives.'"

Genesis 24:27, ESV: "and said, “Blessed be the LORD, the God of my master Abraham, who has not forsaken his steadfast love and his faithfulness toward my master. As for me, the LORD has led me in the way to the house of my master’s kinsmen.”"

Genesis 24:27, KJV: "And he said, Blessed be the LORD God of my master Abraham, who hath not left destitute my master of his mercy and his truth: I being in the way, the LORD led me to the house of my master's brethren."

Genesis 24:27, NASB: "And he said, 'Blessed be the LORD, the God of my master Abraham, who has not abandoned His kindness and His trustworthiness toward my master; as for me, the LORD has guided me in the way to the house of my master’s brothers.'"

Genesis 24:27, NLT: "'Praise the LORD, the God of my master, Abraham,' he said. 'The LORD has shown unfailing love and faithfulness to my master, for he has led me straight to my master's relatives.'"

Genesis 24:27, CSB: "and said, "Blessed be the LORD, the God of my master Abraham, who has not withheld his kindness and faithfulness from my master. As for me, the LORD has led me on the journey to the house of my master's relatives.""

What does Genesis 24:27 mean? [⇑ See verse text ⇑]

When Rebekah reveals that her grandfather is Abraham's brother Nahor, the servant recognizes that God has indeed answered his prayers and brought him right to the doorstep of Isaac's future wife. He stops in the middle of his conversation with Rebekah and worships the Lord.

His prayer reveals his heart. First, the servant blesses the Lord, addressing him once more as the God of his master. Next, he expresses his gratitude and relief that God still has steadfast love and faithfulness for his master. The servant was clearly concerned that if this mission failed, it would suggest that God was no longer concerned with Abraham.

Finally, the servant includes himself in the prayer, giving God the credit for leading him not only to some distant relation of Abraham's, but to Abraham's own immediate family relations.

One note: It was apparently common in this era and in Abraham's family for close relatives to marry each other. This early in human history, there was apparently little risk of genetic issues resulting from the offspring of family members, and God had not yet forbid Israel from marriages between close relatives. In fact, it will become clear that God very much intended for Isaac to marry his cousin Rebekah for the purpose of creating a people that were uniquely His own.