Isaiah 3:10 Parallel Verses [⇓ See commentary ⇓]

Isaiah 3:10, NIV: Tell the righteous it will be well with them, for they will enjoy the fruit of their deeds.

Isaiah 3:10, ESV: Tell the righteous that it shall be well with them, for they shall eat the fruit of their deeds.

Isaiah 3:10, KJV: Say ye to the righteous, that it shall be well with him: for they shall eat the fruit of their doings.

Isaiah 3:10, NASB: Say to the righteous that it will go well for them, For they will eat the fruit of their actions.

Isaiah 3:10, NLT: Tell the godly that all will be well for them. They will enjoy the rich reward they have earned!

Isaiah 3:10, CSB: Tell the righteous that it will go well for them, for they will eat the fruit of their labor.

What does Isaiah 3:10 mean? [⇑ See verse text ⇑]

Isaiah has been describing the terrible judgment coming for Judah and Jerusalem because of the sinful actions and words of the people of the Lord (Genesis 3:1–9). They have proclaimed their sin in the open, in defiance of God. By making those choices, they have brought evil on themselves.

Now Isaiah recognizes that some in Judah may not have participated in this evil. He promises that those who have made righteous choices will experience good because of the good they have done.

This is true in two senses. On the one hand, those who make God-honoring choices in this life are more likely to experience positive outcomes. The Bible describes this as living wisely (Proverbs 3:33–35; 8:36–36). This will not completely shield them from the trials to come. Even the wisest among those in Judah and Jerusalem were going to experience the pain of being attacked and conquered by the Babylonians and the aftermath to follow.

Good results right choices also come in the sense of long-term consequences. God's covenant relationship with Israel promised blessing for those who obeyed God and disaster for those who did not (Deuteronomy 30:15–18). In this way, those faithful to God would be rewarded in the future.

The New Testament makes it clear that eternal salvation from sin comes only through God's grace and by the blood of Christ. Isaiah's book increasingly refers to the Messiah. His prophecy points to the One who was, in Isaiah's time, yet to come. We now know that Promised Messiah to be Christ (Matthew 12:15–21; John 11:27).

Making more good choices than bad in this life does not lead to eternal life with God. Such righteousness cannot be earned; it must be received as a gift through faith (Ephesians 2:1–10).