Genesis 27:9 Parallel Verses [⇓ See commentary ⇓]

Genesis 27:9, NIV: "Go out to the flock and bring me two choice young goats, so I can prepare some tasty food for your father, just the way he likes it."

Genesis 27:9, ESV: "Go to the flock and bring me two good young goats, so that I may prepare from them delicious food for your father, such as he loves."

Genesis 27:9, KJV: "Go now to the flock, and fetch me from thence two good kids of the goats; and I will make them savoury meat for thy father, such as he loveth:"

Genesis 27:9, NASB: "Go now to the flock and bring me two choice young goats from there, so that I may prepare them as a delicious meal for your father, such as he loves."

Genesis 27:9, NLT: "Go out to the flocks, and bring me two fine young goats. I'll use them to prepare your father's favorite dish."

Genesis 27:9, CSB: "Go to the flock and bring me two choice young goats, and I will make them into a delicious meal for your father--the kind he loves."

What does Genesis 27:9 mean? [⇑ See verse text ⇑]

Rebekah has overheard Isaac's plan to pass the family blessing down to Esau (Genesis 27:1–4). First, though, Isaac wants Esau to hunt fresh game for him, and to prepare a delicious meal. This hunting skill is the reason Isaac preferred his older twin son (Genesis 25:28). Rebekah, Isaac's wife, prefers the younger twin, Jacob. She also knows that God has promised to make the younger son dominant (Genesis 25:23). Convinced that Jacob is the one who should receive the blessing, she is putting into motion a plan to deceive Isaac into blessing Jacob instead.

The scheme begins with creating the meal Isaac expects to receive from Esau. To that end, Rebekah instructs Jacob to bring two young goats from the herd so she can make a meal she knows Isaac will love. She apparently plans to duplicate the taste of wild game by using these goats.

Earlier in Genesis, Isaac's parents attempted to "help" God fulfill a promise (Genesis 16:1–5). This, in a sense, is what Rebekah is doing now. That earlier attempt resulted in hurt feelings and a split family (Genesis 21:9–11). The scheme Jacob and Rebekah are about to enact will also cause a terrible rift (Genesis 27:41).