Genesis 27:29 Parallel Verses [⇓ See commentary ⇓]

Genesis 27:29, NIV: "May nations serve you and peoples bow down to you. Be lord over your brothers, and may the sons of your mother bow down to you. May those who curse you be cursed and those who bless you be blessed.'"

Genesis 27:29, ESV: "Let peoples serve you, and nations bow down to you. Be lord over your brothers, and may your mother’s sons bow down to you. Cursed be everyone who curses you, and blessed be everyone who blesses you!”"

Genesis 27:29, KJV: "Let people serve thee, and nations bow down to thee: be lord over thy brethren, and let thy mother's sons bow down to thee: cursed be every one that curseth thee, and blessed be he that blesseth thee."

Genesis 27:29, NASB: "May peoples serve you, And nations bow down to you; Be master of your brothers, And may your mother’s sons bow down to you. Cursed be those who curse you, And blessed be those who bless you.'"

Genesis 27:29, NLT: "May many nations become your servants, and may they bow down to you. May you be the master over your brothers, and may your mother's sons bow down to you. All who curse you will be cursed, and all who bless you will be blessed.'"

Genesis 27:29, CSB: "May peoples serve you and nations bow in worship to you. Be master over your relatives; may your mother's sons bow in worship to you. Those who curse you will be cursed, and those who bless you will be blessed."

What does Genesis 27:29 mean? [⇑ See verse text ⇑]

The scam concocted by Rebekah and Jacob, to steal Esau's blessing from Isaac, is successful (Genesis 27:6–10). Isaac completes his inadvertent blessing of Jacob with this verse. The blessing intended for Esau began in the previous verse with a prayer and/or prediction of God's gifts of material wealth. This verse refers to political power and influence over other peoples and nations, but also over brothers who would bow to the receiver of these words.

Isaac believes the irrevocable blessing which he is praying is being spoken to Esau. Instead, it will be the younger twin, Jacob, and his offspring who will become lord over all. This is just as God's oracle to Rebekah predicted for her twin sons (Genesis 25:23).

Finally, Isaac concludes his prayer of blessing with one of God's earliest promises to Abraham, now passed on to Jacob: Those who blessed or cursed Jacob and his offspring would receive the same in return.

As the following passage will show, however, this fraud did not come without a price. Esau's rage will become murderous (Genesis 27:41), causing Jacob to flee from his family (Genesis 27:43–44), never to see his mother again (Genesis 35:27; 49:31). Also, God will give Jacob a taste of his own medicine later in life, both as the victim of fraud (Genesis 29) and by forcing him to be honest about his name in order to obtain a blessing (Genesis 32:26–28).