Genesis 27:45 Parallel Verses [⇓ See commentary ⇓]

Genesis 27:45, NIV: "When your brother is no longer angry with you and forgets what you did to him, I'll send word for you to come back from there. Why should I lose both of you in one day?'"

Genesis 27:45, ESV: "until your brother’s anger turns away from you, and he forgets what you have done to him. Then I will send and bring you from there. Why should I be bereft of you both in one day?”"

Genesis 27:45, KJV: "Until thy brother's anger turn away from thee, and he forget that which thou hast done to him: then I will send, and fetch thee from thence: why should I be deprived also of you both in one day?"

Genesis 27:45, NASB: "until your brother’s anger against you subsides and he forgets what you did to him. Then I will send word and get you from there. Why should I lose you both in one day?'"

Genesis 27:45, NLT: "When he calms down and forgets what you have done to him, I will send for you to come back. Why should I lose both of you in one day?'"

Genesis 27:45, CSB: "until your brother's rage turns away from you and he forgets what you have done to him. Then I will send for you and bring you back from there. Why should I lose you both in one day?""

What does Genesis 27:45 mean? [⇑ See verse text ⇑]

Esau has a plan to kill Jacob (Genesis 27:41). His rage is sinful, but not unexpected. Jacob conspired with their mother, Rebekah, to fool their blind father, Isaac, into giving a blessing to Jacob instead of Esau (Genesis 27:1–6; 30–35). Rebekah has learned of Esau's vengeful intentions. She is compelling Jacob, actually commanding him, to run for his life to her brother's household in Mesopotamia (Genesis 24:1–4; 24:23–28). She tells Jacob she wants him to stay there until Esau forgets that Jacob has stolen Isaac's blessing from him. She wants Jacob to stay far away until Esau's fury passes (Genesis 27:43–44).

She promises to send for Jacob when that day comes, though she gives no clue about when it might be. She does describe her greatest fear: losing both of her sons. If Esau kills him, Jacob would be dead and then Esau himself would likely be killed or sent away. She desperately wants to prevent that. As it turns out, Rebekah's plot will cost her a relationship with the son she greatly favors (Genesis 25:28). So far as we can tell from Scripture, Jacob will not return until after Rebekah has died (Genesis 35:27; 49:31).