Genesis 27:12 Parallel Verses [⇓ See commentary ⇓]

Genesis 27:12, NIV: "What if my father touches me? I would appear to be tricking him and would bring down a curse on myself rather than a blessing.'"

Genesis 27:12, ESV: "Perhaps my father will feel me, and I shall seem to be mocking him and bring a curse upon myself and not a blessing.”"

Genesis 27:12, KJV: "My father peradventure will feel me, and I shall seem to him as a deceiver; and I shall bring a curse upon me, and not a blessing."

Genesis 27:12, NASB: "Perhaps my father will touch me, then I will be like a deceiver in his sight, and I will bring upon myself a curse and not a blessing.'"

Genesis 27:12, NLT: "What if my father touches me? He'll see that I'm trying to trick him, and then he'll curse me instead of blessing me.'"

Genesis 27:12, CSB: "Suppose my father touches me. Then I will be revealed to him as a deceiver and bring a curse rather than a blessing on myself.""

What does Genesis 27:12 mean? [⇑ See verse text ⇑]

Rebekah has a plan to trick her husband Isaac into giving the family blessing to Jacob instead of Esau. She has overheard Isaac's plans with Esau (Genesis 27:6–8), and has enlisted Jacob to help her in a scheme. She will prepare a meal for Isaac before Esau can return and do the same. Jacob will take that meal into Isaac and receive the blessing (Genesis 27:9–10). This not only reflects the family's ongoing problem with favoritism (Genesis 25:28), it's an example of Rebekah trying to "help" God by forcing his prophecies to come true, as she sees fit (Genesis 25:23).

Now Jacob protests. He's not a hairy man like Esau. What if he gets caught? What if Isaac decides he is mocking the old man and gives him a curse instead of a blessing? Notice, Jacob is not concerned about replicating Esau's appearance. Isaac is nearly or completely blind (Genesis 27:1). He also does not express any worry about the difference in his voice, something that will very nearly ruin the whole scheme (Genesis 27:22). Most importantly, though, he is not—it seems—the slightest concerned about the morality of what he's about to do. He just doesn't want to be caught and punished.