Genesis 27:25 Parallel Verses [⇓ See commentary ⇓]

Genesis 27:25, NIV: "Then he said, 'My son, bring me some of your game to eat, so that I may give you my blessing.' Jacob brought it to him and he ate; and he brought some wine and he drank."

Genesis 27:25, ESV: "Then he said, “Bring it near to me, that I may eat of my son’s game and bless you.” So he brought it near to him, and he ate; and he brought him wine, and he drank."

Genesis 27:25, KJV: "And he said, Bring it near to me, and I will eat of my son's venison, that my soul may bless thee. And he brought it near to him, and he did eat: and he brought him wine, and he drank."

Genesis 27:25, NASB: "So he said, 'Bring it to me, and I will eat of my son’s game, that I may bless you.' And he brought it to him, and he ate; he also brought him wine and he drank."

Genesis 27:25, NLT: "Then Isaac said, 'Now, my son, bring me the wild game. Let me eat it, and then I will give you my blessing.' So Jacob took the food to his father, and Isaac ate it. He also drank the wine that Jacob served him."

Genesis 27:25, CSB: "Then he said, "Bring it closer to me, and let me eat some of my son's game so that I can bless you." Jacob brought it closer to him, and he ate; he brought him wine, and he drank."

What does Genesis 27:25 mean? [⇑ See verse text ⇑]

Isaac has attempted to privately pass along his fatherly blessing to Esau, the oldest of his twin sons. He requested Esau to bring him his favorite food, so that he could bestow this gift (Genesis 27:1–5). However, Isaac's wife, Rebekah, overheard the plan and conspired with her favorite of the twins, Jacob, to steal the blessing (Genesis 27:6–10). This elaborate scam involved disguising Jacob so that the elderly, blind Isaac would think he was speaking to the other brother (Genesis 27:11–17).

Though Isaac never seems fully convinced that the son in front of him is Esau (Genesis 27:21–23), he finally decides to eat the meal brought for him. For Isaac, eating this meal and giving the blessing are linked. Together, they are part of a meaningful ceremony. Isaac requests that his son's game be brought to him, still suggesting that he may suspect he is not speaking to the right son.

Still, Isaac eats and drinks what Jacob gives to him. The blessing will follow.