John 18:33 Parallel Verses [⇓ See commentary ⇓]

John 18:33, NIV: Pilate then went back inside the palace, summoned Jesus and asked him, 'Are you the king of the Jews?'

John 18:33, ESV: So Pilate entered his headquarters again and called Jesus and said to him, “Are you the King of the Jews?”

John 18:33, KJV: Then Pilate entered into the judgment hall again, and called Jesus, and said unto him, Art thou the King of the Jews?

John 18:33, NASB: Therefore Pilate entered the Praetorium again, and summoned Jesus and said to Him, 'You are the King of the Jews?'

John 18:33, NLT: Then Pilate went back into his headquarters and called for Jesus to be brought to him. 'Are you the king of the Jews?' he asked him.

John 18:33, CSB: Then Pilate went back into the headquarters, summoned Jesus, and said to him, "Are you the king of the Jews? "

What does John 18:33 mean? [⇑ See verse text ⇑]

Pilate has already indicated a lack of interest in Jesus (John 18:29–31). He's well aware of the jealous tension between Christ and the religious leaders of Jerusalem (Matthew 27:18; Mark 15:10). He has only two reasons for interviewing Jesus. First, the scribes and Pharisees are accusing Jesus of rebelling against Roman rule by declaring Himself a "king" (Luke 23:2). Second, Jesus' unusual popularity (Matthew 21:1–11; John 12:12–19) makes that something worth looking in to.

Most likely, John's record condenses the conversation between Pilate and Jesus (John 18:34–38). John includes the crucial points: Jesus is not claiming an earthly kingdom, Pilate has no interest in Jewish spirituality, and Pilate's preference is to let Jesus go.

Jesus was brought inside Pilate's Roman offices, as most accused prisoners would be. His accusers have remained outside to avoid contact with a Gentile's "unclean" home prior to Passover (John 18:28). The fact that Pilate has to come back outside to speak with religious leaders also lets Jesus' enemies apply mob pressure, threatening to riot (John 19:12–15; Matthew 27:24).