Genesis 10:25 Parallel Verses [⇓ See commentary ⇓]

Genesis 10:25, NIV: "Two sons were born to Eber: One was named Peleg, because in his time the earth was divided; his brother was named Joktan."

Genesis 10:25, ESV: "To Eber were born two sons: the name of the one was Peleg, for in his days the earth was divided, and his brother’s name was Joktan."

Genesis 10:25, KJV: "And unto Eber were born two sons: the name of one was Peleg; for in his days was the earth divided; and his brother's name was Joktan."

Genesis 10:25, NASB: "Two sons were born to Eber; the name of the one was Peleg, for in his days the earth was divided; and his brother’s name was Joktan."

Genesis 10:25, NLT: "Eber had two sons. The first was named Peleg (which means 'division'), for during his lifetime the people of the world were divided into different language groups. His brother's name was Joktan."

Genesis 10:25, CSB: "Eber had two sons. One was named Peleg, for during his days the earth was divided; his brother was named Joktan."

What does Genesis 10:25 mean? [⇑ See verse text ⇑]

This verse continues the genealogy of Noah's son Shem. Shem's great grandson Eber fathered two sons. Shem's line will continue through Peleg to Abraham and the Israelites.

This passage also makes an interesting comment about one of Shem's descendants, Peleg. Peleg's name apparently comes from an ancient word meaning "to divide." The division of the earth in Peleg's mentioned here likely refers to the division and dispersal of humanity that will happen after the events surrounding the tower of Babel. At that point, mankind will be dispersed over the earth, and their languages confused. Those events are described in chapter 11.

This side-long reference to Peleg is also useful for understanding ancient writing. This part of Genesis describes the descendants of Noah's sons, including their eventual geography. But chapter 11 will describe a moment when mankind is dispersed over the earth. This is due to the fact that Genesis, like many ancient records, is more concerned with themes than with chronology. In other words, the story of the Tower of Babel is not the point of this particular text, so it will be mentioned later.

Scholars suggest that Eber's other son Joktan will become the father of Arab peoples.