Chapter
Verse

Luke 14:14

ESV and you will be blessed, because they cannot repay you. For you will be repaid at the resurrection of the just.”
NIV and you will be blessed. Although they cannot repay you, you will be repaid at the resurrection of the righteous.'
NASB and you will be blessed, since they do not have the means to repay you; for you will be repaid at the resurrection of the righteous.'
CSB And you will be blessed, because they cannot repay you; for you will be repaid at the resurrection of the righteous."
NLT Then at the resurrection of the righteous, God will reward you for inviting those who could not repay you.'
KJV And thou shalt be blessed; for they cannot recompense thee: for thou shalt be recompensed at the resurrection of the just.

What does Luke 14:14 mean?

Jesus is finishing the second of three lessons set in a formal banquet. A ruler of the Pharisees has invited Him to such a meal, along with several others (Luke 14:1). Bystanders line the wall, listening quietly. When the dinner guests arrived, they tried to figure out which seat they should take. The more honorable their families and reputations, the closer to the host they should sit. Jesus told them a parable about how if they assume too much honor, they could be humiliated if someone greater arrives (Luke 14:7–11).

Now, Jesus is speaking to the host. When providing such a meal, the host shouldn't issue invitations based on who he thinks will raise his social standing. He should invite "the poor, the crippled, the lame, the blind" (Luke 14:13). He should bless those who can neither bolster his reputation among other men nor reciprocate with a similar banquet. Jesus explains why. Food lasts for a truly short time. An honorable reputation lasts a little longer, but it means nothing after death. The reward of God for caring for the poor and the powerless is an honor that will last forever.

Possibly attempting to diffuse the awkwardness of Jesus' words, one of the other guests ignores Jesus' message about humility and service and focuses on the blessing of God's great feast at the resurrection. Ever willing to adapt to the present situation, Jesus gives a parable about that banquet, specifically how the guests around Him are in danger of missing out because they focus too much on the worries and blessings of the world. The weak, the sick, and the sinners will be more likely to answer God's invitation (Luke 14:15–24).
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