Chapter

Luke chapter 19

English Standard Version

11As they heard these things, he proceeded to tell a parable, because he was near to Jerusalem, and because they supposed that the kingdom of God was to appear immediately. 12He said therefore, "A nobleman went into a far country to receive for himself a kingdom and then return. 13Calling ten of his servants, he gave them ten minas, and said to them, ‘Engage in business until I come.’ 14But his citizens hated him and sent a delegation after him, saying, ‘We do not want this man to reign over us.’ 15When he returned, having received the kingdom, he ordered these servants to whom he had given the money to be called to him, that he might know what they had gained by doing business. 16The first came before him, saying, ‘Lord, your mina has made ten minas more.’ 17And he said to him, ‘Well done, good servant! Because you have been faithful in a very little, you shall have authority over ten cities.’ 18And the second came, saying, ‘Lord, your mina has made five minas.’ 19And he said to him, ‘And you are to be over five cities.’ 20Then another came, saying, ‘Lord, here is your mina, which I kept laid away in a handkerchief; 21for I was afraid of you, because you are a severe man. You take what you did not deposit, and reap what you did not sow.’ 22He said to him, ‘I will condemn you with your own words, you wicked servant! You knew that I was a severe man, taking what I did not deposit and reaping what I did not sow? 23Why then did you not put my money in the bank, and at my coming I might have collected it with interest?’ 24And he said to those who stood by, ‘Take the mina from him, and give it to the one who has the ten minas.’ 25And they said to him, ‘Lord, he has ten minas!’ 26‘I tell you that to everyone who has, more will be given, but from the one who has not, even what he has will be taken away. 27But as for these enemies of mine, who did not want me to reign over them, bring them here and slaughter them before me.’"
New International Version

New American Standard Bible

11Now while they were listening to these things, Jesus went on to tell a parable, because He was near Jerusalem and they thought that the kingdom of God was going to appear immediately. 12So He said, 'A nobleman went to a distant country to receive a kingdom for himself, and then to return. 13And he called ten of his own slaves and gave them ten minas, and said to them, ‘Do business with this money until I come back.14But his citizens hated him and sent a delegation after him, saying, ‘We do not want this man to reign over us.’ 15When he returned after receiving the kingdom, he ordered that these slaves, to whom he had given the money, be summoned to him so that he would learn how much they had made by the business they had done. 16The first slave appeared, saying, ‘ Master, your mina has made ten minas more.’ 17And he said to him, ‘Well done, good slave; since you have been faithful in a very little thing, you are to have authority over ten cities.’ 18The second one came, saying, ‘Your mina, master, has made five minas.’ 19And he said to him also, ‘And you are to be over five cities.’ 20And then another came, saying, ‘Master, here is your mina, which I kept tucked away in a handkerchief; 21for I was afraid of you, because you are a demanding man; you take up what you did not lay down, and reap what you did not sow.’ 22He *said to him, ‘ From your own lips I will judge you, you worthless slave. Did you know that I am a demanding man, taking up what I did not lay down, and reaping what I did not sow? 23And so why did you not put my money in the bank, and when I came back, I would have collected it with interest?’ 24And then he said to the other slaves who were present, ‘Take the mina away from him and give it to the one who has the ten minas.’ 25And they said to him, ‘Master, he already has ten minas.’ 26‘I tell you that to everyone who has, more shall be given, but from the one who does not have, even what he does have shall be taken away. 27But as for these enemies of mine who did not want me to reign over them, bring them here and slaughter them in my presence.’?'
Christian Standard Bible

New Living Translation

King James Version

15And it came to pass, that when he was returned, having received the kingdom, then he commanded these servants to be called unto him, to whom he had given the money, that he might know how much every man had gained by trading. 16Then came the first, saying, Lord, thy pound hath gained ten pounds. 17And he said unto him, Well, thou good servant: because thou hast been faithful in a very little, have thou authority over ten cities. 18And the second came, saying, Lord, thy pound hath gained five pounds. 19And he said likewise to him, Be thou also over five cities. 20And another came, saying, Lord, behold, here is thy pound, which I have kept laid up in a napkin: 21For I feared thee, because thou art an austere man: thou takest up that thou laidst not down, and reapest that thou didst not sow. 22And he saith unto him, Out of thine own mouth will I judge thee, thou wicked servant. Thou knewest that I was an austere man, taking up that I laid not down, and reaping that I did not sow: 23Wherefore then gavest not thou my money into the bank, that at my coming I might have required mine own with usury? 24And he said unto them that stood by, Take from him the pound, and give it to him that hath ten pounds. 25(And they said unto him, Lord, he hath ten pounds.) 26For I say unto you, That unto every one which hath shall be given; and from him that hath not, even that he hath shall be taken away from him. 27But those mine enemies, which would not that I should reign over them, bring hither, and slay them before me.
New King James Version

What does Luke chapter 19 mean?

Luke 19 contains the end of Jesus' traveling ministry and the beginning of what some scholars refer to as "the presentation of Jesus in Jerusalem." The so-called "travelogue to Jerusalem" began in Luke 9:51 and ends in Luke 19:27. It covers a long collection of narrative, miracles, and parables giving the foundation for understanding the kingdom of God. In Luke 19:28—21:38, through a series of confrontations and discussions, Jesus will give Jewish religious leaders one last opportunity to accept Him as their Messiah.

Luke 19:1–10 is the famous story of Zacchaeus the tax collector. As Jesus is traveling through the area around Jericho, an especially short man hears that He is coming. To see over the crowd, Zacchaeus climbs a sycamore tree. Jesus notices him and invites Himself to Zacchaeus' house. Zacchaeus is honored and by the end of the evening, he has repented of his sins. As a result, he promises to give half of all he owns to the poor and repay his theft victims four times over. Jesus declares that "salvation has come to this house" (Luke 19:9).

In Luke 19:11–27, Jesus tells the parable of the ten minas. He and His disciples are approaching Jerusalem. His followers still think the kingdom of God is coming soon. Jesus tells a story about how they need to be faithful with what He will entrust them. He is like a nobleman who will leave to receive a kingdom. They will not know when He will return. Those who are diligent to use His gifts well will receive great honor when He returns. Those who don't prove they don't really follow Him; they will be destroyed. The parable is like the parable of the talents in Matthew 25:14–30.

Luke 19:28–40 records the triumphal entry. Jesus rides into Jerusalem on a donkey, as would a peaceful traveler, rather than on a warhorse like a conquering king (1 Kings 1:33; Zechariah 9:9–10). The people around Him cry out the traditional praises to God given when climbing the hill to the temple for Passover. The Pharisees understand what is happening and rebuke Jesus for letting His disciples carry on in such a manner. Jesus tells them that if they were silent, the rocks would cry out. Matthew 21:1–11, Mark 11:1–10, and John 12:12–15 also cover the triumphal entry.

In Luke 19:41–44, as Jesus looks upon Jerusalem and the temple Mount, He is overcome by what will happen. The Jewish religious and civil leaders will reject Him, their Messiah, bringing a spiritual destruction upon the nation. Then, about forty years later, the city itself will be destroyed by the Roman army. The thought of all that loss brings Him to tears.

In Luke 19:45–46, Jesus sees merchants have filled the Court of the Gentiles around the temple. Some are selling animals and other items traveling Jews must buy for their sacrifices; others are money changers for those who need to pay the temple tax. What Jesus sees is apparently upsetting: the temple grounds are being used for crass commercialism and sincere pilgrims are being taken advantage of. Jesus drives all the businessmen out. Matthew 21:12–13 and Mark 11:15–19 also record Jesus cleansing the temple. John 2:13–22 is similar but probably records an event early in Jesus' public ministry. It might even be that Jesus evicted the same general group of men twice on two separate occasions.

Luke 19:47–18 is a synopsis of how Jesus will spend the week. He will go to the temple and teach everyone willing to listen. As His popularity grows, the Sadducees, chief priests, and city elders will grow increasingly concerned. They conspire to destroy Him. First, however, they need to get Him away from the people.

Luke 20 contains some of the discussions Jesus has on the Temple Mount during this week. In Luke 21, He warns the disciples of the destruction of the temple and Jerusalem, the persecution they will face, and His eventual return. Luke 22–24 covers the Last Supper; Jesus' arrest, trials, crucifixion, and resurrection; and some of the reunions He shares with those who love Him. From there, Luke continues the story of the church in the book of Acts.
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