John 8:2 Parallel Verses [⇓ See commentary ⇓]

John 8:2, NIV: "At dawn he appeared again in the temple courts, where all the people gathered around him, and he sat down to teach them."

John 8:2, ESV: "Early in the morning he came again to the temple. All the people came to him, and he sat down and taught them."

John 8:2, KJV: "And early in the morning he came again into the temple, and all the people came unto him; and he sat down, and taught them."

John 8:2, NASB: "And early in the morning He came again into the temple area, and all the people were coming to Him; and He sat down and began teaching them."

John 8:2, NLT: "but early the next morning he was back again at the Temple. A crowd soon gathered, and he sat down and taught them."

John 8:2, CSB: "At dawn he went to the temple again, and all the people were coming to him. He sat down and began to teach them."

What does John 8:2 mean? [⇑ See verse text ⇑]

At the end of chapter 7, Jesus was preaching during the Feast of Booths, using the rituals being performed as analogies for His own role as Messiah (John 7:37–38). The story here represents a sudden change in tone and content, which most scholars believe is not original to the text. Rather, this story of the adulterous woman is believed to be an authentic, true account, but one initially recorded in some other location of Scripture. Jesus' reference to light in verse 12 makes much more sense in the context of the Feast of Booths, where great lamps were lit as part of the festival. This passage, then, is useful and important, but needs to be considered separately from the surrounding context.

Scripture often records Jesus speaking and teaching to crowds (Luke 4:20; Matthew 5:1). It is Jesus' growing attention from the people of Jerusalem which worries the local religious leaders. In this passage, they once again attempt to trick Jesus in order to ruin His reputation with the people. Unlike other attempts, however, this one involves both a moral dilemma and a powerful, real-life example. Jesus' response to this trap teaches us about the importance of restraint, as well as sound judgment.