John 3:11 Parallel Verses [⇓ See commentary ⇓]

John 3:11, NIV: "Very truly I tell you, we speak of what we know, and we testify to what we have seen, but still you people do not accept our testimony."

John 3:11, ESV: "Truly, truly, I say to you, we speak of what we know, and bear witness to what we have seen, but you do not receive our testimony."

John 3:11, KJV: "Verily, verily, I say unto thee, We speak that we do know, and testify that we have seen; and ye receive not our witness."

John 3:11, NASB: "Truly, truly, I say to you, we speak of what we know and testify of what we have seen, and you people do not accept our testimony."

John 3:11, NLT: "I assure you, we tell you what we know and have seen, and yet you won't believe our testimony."

John 3:11, CSB: ""Truly I tell you, we speak what we know and we testify to what we have seen, but you do not accept our testimony."

What does John 3:11 mean? [⇑ See verse text ⇑]

In earlier verses, Jesus said one reason people do not understand is because they will not understand. In other words, the problem is not a lack of evidence, or a lack of reason, but a lack of interest. Knowing the truth is not the same as submitting to the truth. The Pharisees know quite a bit about the Old Testament, but they won't submit to the authority of Christ. Jesus was described in John 1:1 as "The Word," from the Greek term Logos. Jesus is the living message of God, and what He says comes from God. Nicodemus recognizes this in Jesus' miracles (John 3:2), but he is still having a hard time seeing the truth. His legalism and traditions are getting in the way.

Here again, Jesus repeats the word amen, which has been kept intact through translations. The term means "believe," or "surely," and is usually used after saying something a person sincerely hopes to be true. This is why we respond with "amen" to something we strongly agree with. Using it at the beginning of a statement implies that the person speaking has first-hand knowledge, and are not relying on anyone else for it. It's a strong claim of knowledge and authority.