Titus 2:5 Parallel Verses [⇓ See commentary ⇓]

Titus 2:5, NIV: "to be self-controlled and pure, to be busy at home, to be kind, and to be subject to their husbands, so that no one will malign the word of God."

Titus 2:5, ESV: "to be self-controlled, pure, working at home, kind, and submissive to their own husbands, that the word of God may not be reviled."

Titus 2:5, KJV: "To be discreet, chaste, keepers at home, good, obedient to their own husbands, that the word of God be not blasphemed."

Titus 2:5, NASB: "to be sensible, pure, workers at home, kind, being subject to their own husbands, so that the word of God will not be dishonored."

Titus 2:5, NLT: "to live wisely and be pure, to work in their homes, to do good, and to be submissive to their husbands. Then they will not bring shame on the word of God."

Titus 2:5, CSB: "to be self-controlled, pure, workers at home, kind, and in submission to their husbands, so that God's word will not be slandered."

What does Titus 2:5 mean? [⇑ See verse text ⇑]

In verse 5, Paul instructs young women in godly living. He focuses on five specific areas. First, young women are to be "self-controlled," or "sensible," a trait also expected of older men in verse 2. Second, they were to be "pure." This trait, highly valued by Paul, is mentioned three times in Titus 1:15. Third, young women were to be "busy at home," or "homemakers." The phrase does not prohibit women working another job, or working outside the home. Rather, it highlights the critical value women have in caring for the home. Some women in Crete were likely known for being lazy (Titus 1:12–13) and living for pleasure. In contrast, godly young women were to be known for their concern for their home.

Fourth, young women were to be "kind." This trait is also part of the fruit of the Spirit given by Paul (Galatians 5:22–23), which is relevant for all Christians. Fifth, young women were to be "submissive to their own husbands." In Titus, this is meant to be in contrast to the culture of non-believers in Crete, where wives likely disrespected their husbands. However, Paul also develops the concept of wives submitting to their husband elsewhere (Ephesians 5:22–33), as does Peter (1 Peter 3:5). This submission does not mean living as a servant, or never taking initiative. Rather, it means living with love under a husband's leadership. Paul compares Christian marriage with the relationship between Christ and the church (Ephesians 5:22–33).