Romans 16:23 Parallel Verses [⇓ See commentary ⇓]

Romans 16:23, NIV: Gaius, whose hospitality I and the whole church here enjoy, sends you his greetings. Erastus, who is the city's director of public works, and our brother Quartus send you their greetings.

Romans 16:23, ESV: Gaius, who is host to me and to the whole church, greets you. Erastus, the city treasurer, and our brother Quartus, greet you.

Romans 16:23, KJV: Gaius mine host, and of the whole church, saluteth you. Erastus the chamberlain of the city saluteth you, and Quartus a brother.

Romans 16:23, NASB: Gaius, host to me and to the whole church, greets you. Erastus, the city treasurer, greets you, and Quartus, the brother.

Romans 16:23, NLT: Gaius says hello to you. He is my host and also serves as host to the whole church. Erastus, the city treasurer, sends you his greetings, and so does our brother Quartus.

Romans 16:23, CSB: Gaius, who is host to me and to the whole church, greets you. Erastus, the city treasurer, and our brother Quartus greet you.

What does Romans 16:23 mean? [⇑ See verse text ⇑]

Paul sends greetings to the Christians in Rome from three more of the men with him in Corinth. Three men named Gaius are mentioned in the New Testament (Acts 20:4; 3 John 1; 1 Corinthians 1:14). This one is most probably the same one mentioned by Paul in 1 Corinthians 1:14 as a man he baptized while in Corinth. Paul is apparently staying at Gaius's house. He describes Gaius as a host to the entire church, perhaps meaning that his regular practice is to host Christians from out of town or that the church in Corinth, or some part of it, meets in Gaius's home.

Christian converts in the early church were found at all levels of social and economic status in society. Paul describes a man named Erastus as a city official. Depending on how the term oikonomos is interpreted, he was the city treasurer, a director of public works, or some civil officer. Some have suggested that an inscription found in the ruins of ancient Corinth in 1929, mentioning a man named Erastus as an "aedile," is this same man.

Paul sends his final greeting from a fellow believer named Quartus, a man not mentioned anywhere else in the New Testament.