Jude 1:1 Parallel Verses [⇓ See commentary ⇓]

Jude 1:1, NIV: Jude, a servant of Jesus Christ and a brother of James, To those who have been called, who are loved in God the Father and kept for Jesus Christ:

Jude 1:1, ESV: Jude, a servant of Jesus Christ and brother of James, To those who are called, beloved in God the Father and kept for Jesus Christ:

Jude 1:1, KJV: Jude, the servant of Jesus Christ, and brother of James, to them that are sanctified by God the Father, and preserved in Jesus Christ, and called:

Jude 1:1, NASB: Jude, a bond-servant of Jesus Christ and brother of James, To those who are the called, beloved in God the Father, and kept for Jesus Christ:

Jude 1:1, NLT: This letter is from Jude, a slave of Jesus Christ and a brother of James. I am writing to all who have been called by God the Father, who loves you and keeps you safe in the care of Jesus Christ.

Jude 1:1, CSB: Jude, a servant of Jesus Christ and a brother of James:To those who are the called, loved by God the Father and kept for Jesus Christ.

What does Jude 1:1 mean? [⇑ See verse text ⇑]

Several views exist concerning Jude's identity, but the most commonly held view identifies him as a brother of the same James who wrote the New Testament book of James. Both of these men were half-brothers of Jesus. In the original language of the New Testament, Jude's name appears as Judas, the same given name as the disciple who betrayed Jesus, but the comparison ends there. The betrayer was the worst apostate of all time, whereas the writer of the book of Jude was an outspoken adversary of apostates. Jude does not appeal to any apostolic authority in order to gain his readers' attention and willingness to heed his words. This is among the reasons scholars identify him as Jesus' half-brother.

And yet, he humbly refers to himself as a servant of Jesus. The word "servant" in Greek is doulos, literally meaning "a bondslave." Jude assures his readers that he is totally committed to doing his Lord's will. He continues in verse 1 by pointing to the work of the Trinity by referring to their spiritual ministries: The Holy Spirit called the readers