John 7:1 Parallel Verses [⇓ See commentary ⇓]

John 7:1, NIV: "After this, Jesus went around in Galilee. He did not want to go about in Judea because the Jewish leaders there were looking for a way to kill him."

John 7:1, ESV: "After this Jesus went about in Galilee. He would not go about in Judea, because the Jews were seeking to kill him."

John 7:1, KJV: "After these things Jesus walked in Galilee: for he would not walk in Jewry, because the Jews sought to kill him."

John 7:1, NASB: "After these things Jesus was walking in Galilee, for He was unwilling to walk in Judea because the Jews were seeking to kill Him."

John 7:1, NLT: "After this, Jesus traveled around Galilee. He wanted to stay out of Judea, where the Jewish leaders were plotting his death."

John 7:1, CSB: "After this, Jesus traveled in Galilee, since he did not want to travel in Judea because the Jews were trying to kill him."

What does John 7:1 mean? [⇑ See verse text ⇑]

As with the first verse of chapter 6, chapter 7 opens with something of an understatement. The time gap between the end of chapter 5 and the start of chapter 6 was about six months. Here there is a similar leap: from the time of Passover to the Feast of Booths (John 7:2). This puts the events of the next few chapters around six months prior to Jesus' eventual crucifixion.

The gospel of John presents Jesus as a man always obedient to God's timeline. Conflict with the religious leaders of Jerusalem is inevitable, and so Jesus spends much of His time in Galilee, away from their direct influence. This only delays the eventual outcome, of course. Jesus has already done enough to earn a death sentence in their eyes, since they interpret His earlier actions as a form of blasphemy (John 5:18). This desire to see Jesus killed will be greatly increased due to His actions during the Feast of Booths.

As is usually the case in the gospel of John, the term "the Jews" is a reference to the religious leaders of Jerusalem and their supporters. This is an important distinction when interpreting the reactions of the crowd to Jesus' words. "The Jews," as described here, are a somewhat separate group from "the people."