John 21:20 Parallel Verses [⇓ See commentary ⇓]

John 21:20, NIV: "Peter turned and saw that the disciple whom Jesus loved was following them. (This was the one who had leaned back against Jesus at the supper and had said, 'Lord, who is going to betray you?')"

John 21:20, ESV: "Peter turned and saw the disciple whom Jesus loved following them, the one who also had leaned back against him during the supper and had said, “Lord, who is it that is going to betray you?”"

John 21:20, KJV: "Then Peter, turning about, seeth the disciple whom Jesus loved following; which also leaned on his breast at supper, and said, Lord, which is he that betrayeth thee?"

John 21:20, NASB: "Peter turned around and *saw the disciple whom Jesus loved following them—the one who also had leaned back on His chest at the supper and said, 'Lord, who is the one who is betraying You?'"

John 21:20, NLT: "Peter turned around and saw behind them the disciple Jesus loved--the one who had leaned over to Jesus during supper and asked, 'Lord, who will betray you?'"

John 21:20, CSB: "So Peter turned around and saw the disciple Jesus loved following them, the one who had leaned back against Jesus at the supper and asked, "Lord, who is the one that's going to betray you? ""

What does John 21:20 mean? [⇑ See verse text ⇑]

After His resurrection, Jesus has met the disciples in Galilee (Matthew 28:9–10). He has performed yet another miracle to prove Himself (John 21:4–8). As He restored Peter to his calling as a disciple (John 21:15–19), Jesus predicted the way in which Peter would die. Using poetic language, He indicated Peter's fate was to by martyred by crucifixion. Tradition says Peter even asked to be nailed upside down, feeling unworthy to die the exact same way as did Christ.

Standing nearby is John (John 13:25), who once again refers to himself in indirect terms (John 13:23; 19:26; 21:24). Here, he confirms that he was the one referred to in the account of the Last Supper when Judas left. Peter, John, and James were the inner circle of Jesus' disciples (Matthew 17:1; Mark 14:33; Luke 8:51). It would be natural for Peter to wonder what would happen to John. That's exactly the question he will ask in the next verse (John 21:21). Jesus won't criticize Peter for asking. He simply reminds Peter there is no need for him to know; Peter can focus on his own faith.