John 16:33 Parallel Verses [⇓ See commentary ⇓]

John 16:33, NIV: "I have told you these things, so that in me you may have peace. In this world you will have trouble. But take heart! I have overcome the world.'"

John 16:33, ESV: "I have said these things to you, that in me you may have peace. In the world you will have tribulation. But take heart; I have overcome the world.”"

John 16:33, KJV: "These things I have spoken unto you, that in me ye might have peace. In the world ye shall have tribulation: but be of good cheer; I have overcome the world."

John 16:33, NASB: "'These things I have spoken to you, so that in Me you may have peace. In the world you have tribulation, but take courage; I have overcome the world.'"

John 16:33, NLT: "I have told you all this so that you may have peace in me. Here on earth you will have many trials and sorrows. But take heart, because I have overcome the world.'"

John 16:33, CSB: "I have told you these things so that in me you may have peace. You will have suffering in this world. Be courageous! I have conquered the world.""

What does John 16:33 mean? [⇑ See verse text ⇑]

Christ's words, recorded here, are among the most cherished in the gospel of John. This statement combines teaching, remembrance, warning, and encouragement. Becoming a Christian does not guarantee an easy life. In fact, Jesus has made it clear that following Him can lead to persecution (John 16:1–4). The joy held by born-again believers comes from knowing that Christ has already obtained ultimate victory, and nothing in this world can undo that (Romans 8:38–39). That Christ made it clear, in advance, that hard times will come (John 15:20–21) should reassure believers: these situations do not take God by surprise.

Several times during the Last Supper, Jesus has pointed out that He is deliberately giving advance warning (John 13:19; 14:25; 16:4). His explicit purpose for this is encouragement; rather than reacting in fear or confusion, Christians should be aware that those experiences are part of God's greater plan. The book of Hebrews, especially chapter 11, celebrates heroes of the faith who chose to "hold fast" and trust in God. That trust, Scripture shows, was well-placed, even if fulfillment of God's promises didn't come until after those believers had passed into eternity.

The "peace" Jesus speaks of is not worldly comfort, or even happiness. This is the confident "rest" (Matthew 11:28–30) believers experience when they set aside anxiety (Matthew 6:25–34), and trust God to work out His will.

As is common in both ancient literature and biblical prophecy, Jesus speaks of something guaranteed by God as if it has already happened. Prior to this Last Supper (John 13:1–5), Christ overcame the temptations of a human life (Hebrews 4:15) and the direct lures of Satan (Matthew 4:1–11). The greater victory, however, will come after His arrest (John 18:1–3) and crucifixion (John 19:18), when He is raised from the dead (John 20:19).

This final statement of confidence leads into one of the holiest portions of the Bible: Christ's High Priestly Prayer in chapter 17.