Matthew 6:30 Parallel Verses [⇓ See commentary ⇓]

Matthew 6:30, NIV: If that is how God clothes the grass of the field, which is here today and tomorrow is thrown into the fire, will he not much more clothe you--you of little faith?

Matthew 6:30, ESV: But if God so clothes the grass of the field, which today is alive and tomorrow is thrown into the oven, will he not much more clothe you, O you of little faith?

Matthew 6:30, KJV: Wherefore, if God so clothe the grass of the field, which to day is, and to morrow is cast into the oven, shall he not much more clothe you, O ye of little faith?

Matthew 6:30, NASB: But if God so clothes the grass of the field, which is alive today and tomorrow is thrown into the furnace, will He not much more clothe you? You of little faith!

Matthew 6:30, NLT: And if God cares so wonderfully for wildflowers that are here today and thrown into the fire tomorrow, he will certainly care for you. Why do you have so little faith?

Matthew 6:30, CSB: If that's how God clothes the grass of the field, which is here today and thrown into the furnace tomorrow, won't he do much more for you--you of little faith?

What does Matthew 6:30 mean? [⇑ See verse text ⇑]

Jesus is teaching even the poorest among His listeners that worrying about money and serving God do not go together. For one thing, worry is ineffective. It doesn't fix anything (Matthew 6:27). More than that, though, is that God's children can trust their Father in heaven to provide what they need. He asked in the previous verses why they worry about what they will wear (Matthew 6:28–29); it's likely some in His original audience literally did not know where the money would come from to replace their tattered garments. He asked them to think about lilies, clothed in splendor despite doing nothing equivalent to human work.

Now He brings the point of that illustration home. God cares much more deeply about His children than He does about birds (Matthew 6:26) or about flowers. The wild lilies are considered only "grass" here. They spring up, bloom in splendor, and quickly die before being raked up and burned. If God provides "clothing" for them, Jesus says, don't you think He will clothe you? Christ has already pointed out that God's blessing does not always mean worldly comfort (Matthew 5:3–12), so His provision can sometimes involve lacking things we think of as "needs."

Jesus ends by addressing those who worry as "you of little faith." That might sound harsh to us; it's important to remember that Jesus is speaking to people He loves, seeking to free them of the burden of fear. Their trust in God should provide peace of mind. That's a strong contrast to those who rely on material wealth to provide what they need.