Matthew 6:13 Parallel Verses [⇓ See commentary ⇓]

Matthew 6:13, NIV: And lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from the evil one.'

Matthew 6:13, ESV: And lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil.

Matthew 6:13, KJV: And lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil: For thine is the kingdom, and the power, and the glory, for ever. Amen.

Matthew 6:13, NASB: And do not lead us into temptation, but deliver us from evil. ’

Matthew 6:13, NLT: And don't let us yield to temptation, but rescue us from the evil one.

Matthew 6:13, CSB: And do not bring us into temptation, but deliver us from the evil one.

What does Matthew 6:13 mean? [⇑ See verse text ⇑]

This verse concludes Matthew's telling of Jesus' model prayer (Matthew 6:9–13). Though this is often referred to as the "Lord's Prayer," this passage is not something Jesus Himself prayed (Hebrews 4:15; Matthew 6:12). This is a pattern meant to be used by His disciples and followers. His intent is not that we always repeat those exact words, but that we apply those lessons in our prayers.

This is the third request for the wellbeing of the one who is praying. The Greek word peirasmon is translated as "temptation" here, and is the same term used of Jesus' experience with Satan in the wilderness (Matthew 4:1). This can refer to being enticed towards sin, or to being tested in a trial. In either case, the phrase is better understood as "lead us away from temptation or testing." James 1:13 makes it clear that God never entices anyone to sin. God obviously has the power, though, to lead His people away from tempting circumstances, including temptation to sin that might come from enduring hard circumstances. We should ask God to do that for us, knowing that even when we're tempted, He always provides us a means to avoid sin (1 Corinthians 10:13).

Eventually, though, temptations usually come. God may choose to allow hard circumstances. In that case, Jesus adds a balance to this request, "but deliver us from evil." This phrase could mean, "deliver us from the temptations of the evil one." Matthew has described Jesus' temptations from the evil one, the devil, in the wilderness (Matthew 4:1–11). Jesus resisted each temptation by quoting Scripture and finally sending the devil away. He now instructs His followers to ask God the Father for deliverance from the temptations of the evil one, as well.