Mark 14:67 Parallel Verses [⇓ See commentary ⇓]

Mark 14:67, NIV: "When she saw Peter warming himself, she looked closely at him. 'You also were with that Nazarene, Jesus,' she said."

Mark 14:67, ESV: "and seeing Peter warming himself, she looked at him and said, “You also were with the Nazarene, Jesus.”"

Mark 14:67, KJV: "And when she saw Peter warming himself, she looked upon him, and said, And thou also wast with Jesus of Nazareth."

Mark 14:67, NASB: "and seeing Peter warming himself, she looked at him and *said, 'You were with Jesus the Nazarene as well.'"

Mark 14:67, NLT: "and noticed Peter warming himself at the fire. She looked at him closely and said, 'You were one of those with Jesus of Nazareth.'"

Mark 14:67, CSB: "When she saw Peter warming himself, she looked at him and said, "You also were with Jesus, the man from Nazareth.""

What does Mark 14:67 mean? [⇑ See verse text ⇑]

John explains the setting with greater detail. Jesus has been arrested and taken to the home of Annas, the former high priest. John follows Jesus and the guards into the courtyard, as he knows the high priest. He then sends a servant girl to bring Peter closer to the proceedings. It is this girl who first asks Peter if he is with Jesus. Peter denies her accusation as he warms himself by a fire, surrounded by the chief priest's servants and guards (John 18:12–18).

While Jesus is on trial before the Sanhedrin, Peter stands trial before servants and soldiers. Jesus gives no defense against the false accusations, fulfilling Scripture (Isaiah 53:7). He merely points out the arresting officials' hypocrisy (Mark 14:48–49) and affirms His identity (Mark 14:61–62). In the courtyard below, Peter won't even admit he's from Galilee (Mark 14:70). Only recently, Jesus had told His disciples to have courage when faced with persecution for His sake, saying, "…do not be anxious beforehand what you are to say, but say whatever is given to you in that hour, for it is not you who speak, but the Holy Spirit" (Mark 13:11). Unfortunately, Peter doesn't yet have the Holy Spirit to guide him (Acts 2:1–4) and, since he didn't use his time in the garden of Gethsemane to strengthen his more human character (Mark 14:32–42), he is entirely powerless against his fear.

John explains that "the servants and officers had made a charcoal fire, because it was cold, and they were standing and warming themselves. Peter also was with them, standing and warming himself" (John 18:18). These are probably the same servants and officers who arrested Jesus and brought Him to the high priest's house. Minutes before, in the garden of Gethsemane, Peter had cut off the ear of one of the servants (John 18:10). Although Jesus healed the servant (Luke 22:51), Peter is in a precarious position.