Mark 14:54 Parallel Verses [⇓ See commentary ⇓]

Mark 14:54, NIV: "Peter followed him at a distance, right into the courtyard of the high priest. There he sat with the guards and warmed himself at the fire."

Mark 14:54, ESV: "And Peter had followed him at a distance, right into the courtyard of the high priest. And he was sitting with the guards and warming himself at the fire."

Mark 14:54, KJV: "And Peter followed him afar off, even into the palace of the high priest: and he sat with the servants, and warmed himself at the fire."

Mark 14:54, NASB: "And Peter had followed Him at a distance, right into the courtyard of the high priest; and he was sitting with the officers and warming himself at the fire."

Mark 14:54, NLT: "Meanwhile, Peter followed him at a distance and went right into the high priest's courtyard. There he sat with the guards, warming himself by the fire."

Mark 14:54, CSB: "Peter followed him at a distance, right into the high priest's courtyard. He was sitting with the servants, warming himself by the fire."

What does Mark 14:54 mean? [⇑ See verse text ⇑]

At the arrest on the Mount of Olives, the disciples scatter (Mark 14:50). Peter and John follow Jesus and the guards to the courtyard of Annas, whose son-in-law, Caiaphas, is the high priest (John 18:12–15). John joins the crowd, as he knows the high priest (John 18:15). The Gospels seem to have contradictory descriptions of where Peter is. Mark and Matthew (Matthew 26:58) say Peter goes into the courtyard, while John says he stays outside, by the gate (John 18:16). Peter probably stays by the gate until the servants make a fire, then he joins them inside (John 18:18). The inclusion of this note in the middle of Jesus' trial indicates that Peter's first denial (Mark 14:66–68) occurs while Annas is questioning Jesus.

John, who knows the high priest (John 18:15), is more specific. First, Jesus is taken to Annas, who had been the high priest for nine years. This is unusual since the office—now controlled by Roman appointment—was supposed to be held for a term of four years. Annas asks Jesus about "his disciples and his teaching" (John 18:19). By law, a man accused of a capital crime can only be convicted upon the testimony of two witnesses or a confession (Deuteronomy 17:6; 19:15; Numbers 35:30). Jesus, knowing that Annas wants Him to incriminate Himself, dares Annas to call the witnesses (John 18:19–21).

Unable to get a confession, Annas takes Jesus to Caiaphas, his son-in-law and the current high priest (John 18:19–24). Caiaphas and the assembled Sanhedrin call the witnesses (Mark 14:55–61). Jesus will not respond to the false accusations regarding His teaching, but after being asked directly if He is the Christ, He "confesses" that He is. In response, the Sanhedrin convicts Him of blasphemy (Mark 14:61–64).