Chapter

Luke 22:19

ESV And he took bread, and when he had given thanks, he broke it and gave it to them, saying, “This is my body, which is given for you. Do this in remembrance of me.”
NIV And he took bread, gave thanks and broke it, and gave it to them, saying, 'This is my body given for you; do this in remembrance of me.'
NASB And when He had taken some bread and given thanks, He broke it and gave it to them, saying, 'This is My body, which is being given for you; do this in remembrance of Me.'
CSB And he took bread, gave thanks, broke it, gave it to them, and said, "This is my body, which is given for you. Do this in remembrance of me."
NLT He took some bread and gave thanks to God for it. Then he broke it in pieces and gave it to the disciples, saying, 'This is my body, which is given for you. Do this in remembrance of me.'
KJV And he took bread, and gave thanks, and brake it, and gave unto them, saying, This is my body which is given for you: this do in remembrance of me.
NKJV And He took bread, gave thanks and broke it, and gave it to them, saying, “This is My body which is given for you; do this in remembrance of Me.”

What does Luke 22:19 mean?

It is halfway through the Passover meal: a ceremonial dinner celebrating God's protection of the Israelites in Egypt. Jesus and the Twelve have thanked God for wine and had the first cup, representing sanctification. They have dipped "bitter herbs"—possibly parsley—into salt water or vinegar. They have drunk the second cup, representing judgment. Now, they break unleavened bread and dip it in bitter herbs and a mixture of fruits, nuts, honey, and wine.

This is the bread of affliction (Deuteronomy 16:3). Pharaoh had witnessed God send nine plagues to judge the Egyptians. The tenth and last was the deaths of the firstborn males of each family. The Israelites took lamb's blood and spread it on their doorposts as God instructed. That night, death "passed over" their homes.

As the Israelites ate, they were dressed for travel. They did not have time for the bread to rise because when the last plague descended, the Egyptians begged the Israelites to leave. The dough the Israelites carried in their bowls was unleavened (Exodus 12).

At this point, Jesus introduces the Lord's Supper. He veers into territory He introduced in John 6. After He fed the five thousand with five loaves and two fish, the people followed. Food was hard to come by, and Jesus knew they wanted to make Him king because they thought He would provide them with all they could eat.

Instead, He said something odd: "I am the bread of life" (John 6:35). Then He said, "I am the living bread that came down from heaven. If anyone eats of this bread, he will live forever. And the bread that I will give for the life of the world is my flesh" (John 6:51).

Jesus doesn't mean His followers need to eat His literal flesh. Nor does bread turn into His body when it is presented for the observance of the Lord's Supper. He means that as God sent manna to nourish the Israelites, so He sent the Son to bring His children the spiritual nourishment they need (John 6:31–33). Because of Jesus' sacrifice, we can be enlivened—directed and empowered—by the Holy Spirit (Romans 6:7–11).
Expand
Expand
Expand
What is the Gospel?
Download the app: