Chapter
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Verse

John 14:9

ESV Jesus said to him, “Have I been with you so long, and you still do not know me, Philip? Whoever has seen me has seen the Father. How can you say, ‘Show us the Father’?
NIV Jesus answered: 'Don't you know me, Philip, even after I have been among you such a long time? Anyone who has seen me has seen the Father. How can you say, 'Show us the Father'?
NASB Jesus *said to him, 'Have I been with you for so long a time, and yet you have not come to know Me, Philip? The one who has seen Me has seen the Father; how can you say, ‘Show us the Father’?
CSB Jesus said to him, "Have I been among you all this time and you do not know me, Philip? The one who has seen me has seen the Father. How can you say, 'Show us the Father'?
NLT Jesus replied, 'Have I been with you all this time, Philip, and yet you still don’t know who I am? Anyone who has seen me has seen the Father! So why are you asking me to show him to you?
KJV Jesus saith unto him, Have I been so long time with you, and yet hast thou not known me, Philip? he that hath seen me hath seen the Father; and how sayest thou then, Shew us the Father?

What does John 14:9 mean?

After Jesus promised to come and bring the disciples to be with Him (John 14:1–4), Thomas had asked how it was possible to know "the way" there when they didn't know where "there" was (John 14:5). Christ responded by claiming to be that way: that the means to salvation was through Him, not through human effort (John 14:6). He also mentioned seeing God (John 14:7), something which Philip was eager to do (John 14:8). Philip's question might have been a request to see something like Isaiah's vision (Isaiah 6:1) or the transfiguration (Matthew 17:1–2).

Jesus starts with a gentle scolding, something He seems to have needed to do often for His inner circle (Matthew 16:9; Mark 8:21). The question itself is probably rhetorical, like asking someone "do you have no brain?" Jesus is not actually implying that Thomas does not know Him—He's making the point that Thomas does know Jesus, and for that reason he should understand what's being said. This figurative way of speaking continues into the next verse, as well.

This leads to a clear, unambiguous statement: to see Christ is to see God. They are One (John 14:7, 10–11). Philip is looking for some miraculous sign, but Jesus indicates His purpose is to be the revelation of God to mankind (2 Corinthians 4:6). In context with His other comments (John 10:30; 17:5), including frequent uses of "I Am" (John 8:58), there's no doubt whatsoever that Jesus confidently claimed to be God.
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