John 11:16 Parallel Verses [⇓ See commentary ⇓]

John 11:16, NIV: "Then Thomas (also known as Didymus) said to the rest of the disciples, 'Let us also go, that we may die with him.'"

John 11:16, ESV: "So Thomas, called the Twin, said to his fellow disciples, “Let us also go, that we may die with him.”"

John 11:16, KJV: "Then said Thomas, which is called Didymus, unto his fellowdisciples, Let us also go, that we may die with him."

John 11:16, NASB: "Therefore Thomas, who was called Didymus, said to his fellow disciples, 'Let’s also go, so that we may die with Him!'"

John 11:16, NLT: "Thomas, nicknamed the Twin, said to his fellow disciples, 'Let's go, too--and die with Jesus.'"

John 11:16, CSB: "Then Thomas (called "Twin") said to his fellow disciples, "Let's go too so that we may die with him.""

What does John 11:16 mean? [⇑ See verse text ⇑]

Jesus is heading back into Judea, a territory controlled by those who want to kill Him (John 11:8). His reason is to "wake up" His friend Lazarus, who has now been dead for several days (John 11:1–7, 17). Jesus points out that this delay is not an accident. One purpose is for the benefit of the disciples. The miracle about to happen is the seventh and most spectacular of those recorded in this gospel. The function of those miracles is to act as "signs" that point toward an important truth: that Jesus is God incarnate and following His mission from God.

The disciples have already shown that even if they lack wisdom, they sincerely believe in Jesus and are willing to follow more loyally than others (John 6:66–69). Loyalty does not require optimism, however. Thomas—the same disciple often criticized for doubting Jesus' eventual resurrection (John 20:24–29)—seems convinced that this is a suicide mission. All the same, he is willing to go, apparently resigned to his fate. Or, at least, he feels the need to express some "gallows humor" about what is happening.