Hebrews 13:20 Parallel Verses [⇓ See commentary ⇓]

Hebrews 13:20, NIV: Now may the God of peace, who through the blood of the eternal covenant brought back from the dead our Lord Jesus, that great Shepherd of the sheep,

Hebrews 13:20, ESV: Now may the God of peace who brought again from the dead our Lord Jesus, the great shepherd of the sheep, by the blood of the eternal covenant,

Hebrews 13:20, KJV: Now the God of peace, that brought again from the dead our Lord Jesus, that great shepherd of the sheep, through the blood of the everlasting covenant,

Hebrews 13:20, NASB: Now may the God of peace, who brought up from the dead the great Shepherd of the sheep through the blood of the eternal covenant, that is, Jesus our Lord,

Hebrews 13:20, NLT: Now may the God of peace--who brought up from the dead our Lord Jesus, the great Shepherd of the sheep, and ratified an eternal covenant with his blood--

Hebrews 13:20, CSB: Now may the God of peace, who brought up from the dead our Lord Jesus--the great Shepherd of the sheep--through the blood of the everlasting covenant,

What does Hebrews 13:20 mean? [⇑ See verse text ⇑]

This verse begins the formal close to this letter to persecuted Jewish Christians. The benediction offered in verses 20 and 21 echoes several of the highlights from the book of Hebrews.

God is frequently associated with peace (1 Thessalonians 5:23; Philippians 4:7; Romans 15:33). In the context of the book of Hebrews, this "peace" is closely tied to the reconciliation we're offered through Jesus Christ. Rather than God choosing a long-term system of fear, wrath, and judgment (Hebrews 12:18–21), He lovingly provided us with grace (Hebrews 12:22–29).

Likewise, references to Christ as a shepherd are common in the Bible. Jesus instigated this comparison Himself, often using it as a way to explain His role as Messiah (John 10:1–6; 10:7–13; 10:14–16). The shepherd imagery implies guidance, protection, and care. Prior text in the book of Hebrews referred to Christ as a leader, author, or captain—an example to be followed (Hebrews 2:10; 12:2).

The writer also refers to the resurrection of Christ. This is the capstone event proving the ministry of Jesus as something truly from God (Acts 5:30; 1 Corinthians 6:14; Colossians 2:12). Other New Testament passages note that Jesus' return from the dead is the lynch-pin of Christian faith (1 Corinthians 15:13–20). Interestingly, this is the first time the book of Hebrews specifically mentions Jesus' resurrection. The intent of this letter was to show that Jesus' ministry on our behalf was always God's plan. Discussion of Christ, here, has focused mostly on the parallels between Jesus' sacrifice and those prescribed in the old covenant.

The writer also reiterates the idea of the new covenant being "eternal." This is true both looking forwards and backwards. Looking into the past, the writer of Hebrews showed how God had always intended to establish a "new covenant" in order to save mankind (Hebrews 8:4–8). Looking to the future, the results of the new covenant were described as something which "cannot be shaken," in contrast to the temporary things of earth (Hebrews 12:25–29).