Genesis 45:28 Parallel Verses [⇓ See commentary ⇓]

Genesis 45:28, NIV: "And Israel said, 'I'm convinced! My son Joseph is still alive. I will go and see him before I die.'"

Genesis 45:28, ESV: "And Israel said, “It is enough; Joseph my son is still alive. I will go and see him before I die.”"

Genesis 45:28, KJV: "And Israel said, It is enough; Joseph my son is yet alive: I will go and see him before I die."

Genesis 45:28, NASB: "Then Israel said, 'It is enough; my son Joseph is still alive. I will go and see him before I die.'"

Genesis 45:28, NLT: "Then Jacob exclaimed, 'It must be true! My son Joseph is alive! I must go and see him before I die.'"

Genesis 45:28, CSB: "Then Israel said, "Enough! My son Joseph is still alive. I will go to see him before I die.""

What does Genesis 45:28 mean? [⇑ See verse text ⇑]

Fittingly, this verse once again refers to Jacob using the name Israel. This is the name given to him by the Lord after they wrestled before Jacob's fearful reunion with Esau (Genesis 32:24–28). Both names continue to be used interchangeably in the book of Genesis.

What Israel says demonstrates that he has accepted the story his sons have told him. He believes Joseph is alive and thriving as a ruler over all of Egypt (Genesis 45:25). That leaves the question of what to do about his ten oldest sons—they had cruelly sold Joseph into slavery and then lied about it (Genesis 37:24–33). Amazingly, Jacob chooses to focus purely on the good in this tremendous turn of events. He declares "it is enough" to know that Joseph is not dead.

Jacob accepts this incredible news as God's provision for him in his old age. Not only did God protect Jacob's family from all the things he feared, including losing Benjamin and starving in the famine, God has somehow also given him the impossible gift of returning the son that was lost. Jacob announces his intention to travel to Egypt and see Joseph before he dies. In doing so, he agrees to Joseph's plan to move the family to Egypt. There, they will be provided for during the severe famine. This disaster will continue to afflict the world for another five years (Genesis 45:5–7).

Despite Jacob's sense of his impending death, he would live another 17 years in the land of Egypt (Genesis 47:28). As he sets out, he will also be reassured by God that this is the right course of action (Genesis 46:2–4).