Genesis 41:44 Parallel Verses [⇓ See commentary ⇓]

Genesis 41:44, NIV: Then Pharaoh said to Joseph, 'I am Pharaoh, but without your word no one will lift hand or foot in all Egypt.'

Genesis 41:44, ESV: Moreover, Pharaoh said to Joseph, “I am Pharaoh, and without your consent no one shall lift up hand or foot in all the land of Egypt.”

Genesis 41:44, KJV: And Pharaoh said unto Joseph, I am Pharaoh, and without thee shall no man lift up his hand or foot in all the land of Egypt.

Genesis 41:44, NASB: Moreover, Pharaoh said to Joseph, 'Though I am Pharaoh, yet without your permission no one shall raise his hand or foot in all the land of Egypt.'

Genesis 41:44, NLT: And Pharaoh said to him, 'I am Pharaoh, but no one will lift a hand or foot in the entire land of Egypt without your approval.'

Genesis 41:44, CSB: Pharaoh said to Joseph, "I am Pharaoh and no one will be able to raise his hand or foot in all the land of Egypt without your permission."

What does Genesis 41:44 mean? [⇑ See verse text ⇑]

After witnessing firsthand that the Spirit of God was with Joseph and hearing his plan to save Egypt from famine (Genesis 41:28–36), Pharaoh quickly took action. He put Joseph in charge of preparing for the crisis. In fact, Pharaoh put Joseph in charge of everything in the kingdom, second only to himself (Genesis 41:39–41). To signify this, Joseph was given the appropriate clothing, jewelry, signets, and other marks of power. He was given the Pharaoh's second chariot and taken through the streets for the people to kneel in respect (Genesis 41:42–43).

Finally, Pharaoh summarizes the new arrangement to make clear how much authority Joseph has in Egypt. Speaking symbolically, he says Joseph has total authority in all matters. There is nothing, however small, in the nation which Joseph cannot command or control. He is empowered to redirect all resources of the entire nation for the purpose of preparing the land for the devastating famine heading their way.

This was likely a head-spinning series of events for Joseph. He had been sold into slavery years ago by his own brothers (Genesis 37:28). His most recent "job," so to speak, was an assistant in the jail where he himself was imprisoned (Genesis 39:21–23). And now he's been thrust into a position of enormous power and responsibility. His rise from jail to near-absolute power would have been stunning. Joseph must have been thoroughly convinced that God remained with him, even in his captivity (Genesis 41:38). Later, he will come to realize that these sufferings were all part of a plan to save Joseph's own family (Genesis 50:15–20).