Genesis 30:30 Parallel Verses [⇓ See commentary ⇓]

Genesis 30:30, NIV: "The little you had before I came has increased greatly, and the LORD has blessed you wherever I have been. But now, when may I do something for my own household?'"

Genesis 30:30, ESV: "For you had little before I came, and it has increased abundantly, and the LORD has blessed you wherever I turned. But now when shall I provide for my own household also?”"

Genesis 30:30, KJV: "For it was little which thou hadst before I came, and it is now increased unto a multitude; and the LORD hath blessed thee since my coming: and now when shall I provide for mine own house also?"

Genesis 30:30, NASB: "For you had little before I came, and it has increased to a multitude, and the LORD has blessed you wherever I turned. But now, when shall I provide for my own household also?'"

Genesis 30:30, NLT: "You had little indeed before I came, but your wealth has increased enormously. The LORD has blessed you through everything I've done. But now, what about me? When can I start providing for my own family?'"

Genesis 30:30, CSB: "For you had very little before I came, but now your wealth has increased. The LORD has blessed you because of me. And now, when will I also do something for my own family?""

What does Genesis 30:30 mean? [⇑ See verse text ⇑]

Laban has told Jacob that, instead of leaving, he should name his own price, his own wages, to continue working for Laban (Genesis 30:25–28). Jacob is beginning to name that price. He starts by appealing to Laban, the father and grandfather of Jacob's wives and children, about his need to provide for his own family.

Jacob reminds his father-in-law that before Jacob arrived, he had little. Laban has already said that he knows this is true. It's why he doesn't want Jacob to leave. Because of the Lord's blessing on Jacob, Laban was able to prosper—helped in no small part by Laban's own treachery (Genesis 29:18–30).

Whatever comes next, both of these men clearly understand that Laban's wealth and Jacob's success with the livestock are the result of God's blessing, and a blessing on Jacob in particular. Whatever their motives, both men are negotiating from a position of faith in God's power and His faithfulness to keep His promises to Jacob.