Genesis 30:22 Parallel Verses [⇓ See commentary ⇓]

Genesis 30:22, NIV: "Then God remembered Rachel; he listened to her and enabled her to conceive."

Genesis 30:22, ESV: "Then God remembered Rachel, and God listened to her and opened her womb."

Genesis 30:22, KJV: "And God remembered Rachel, and God hearkened to her, and opened her womb."

Genesis 30:22, NASB: "Then God remembered Rachel, and God listened to her and opened her womb."

Genesis 30:22, NLT: "Then God remembered Rachel's plight and answered her prayers by enabling her to have children."

Genesis 30:22, CSB: "Then God remembered Rachel. He listened to her and opened her womb."

What does Genesis 30:22 mean? [⇑ See verse text ⇑]

Rachel has always been deeply loved by Jacob. He was willing to work seven years for the privilege of marrying her, only to be tricked into taking her older sister, Leah, instead. And yet, Jacob's love for Rachel was enough for him to agree to another seven years of labor for the right to marry her a week later (Genesis 29:18–30). Leah, in part because of this history, has never been shown affection by Jacob (Genesis 29:31). In part due to God's sympathy for Leah's pain, and though Rachel seems to have held on to Jacob's primary affection Rachel has never been able to give Jacob a son. Leah, on the other hand, has given him six sons by birth, two sons through her servant girl Zilpah, and at least one daughter, Dinah.

Now Rachel's long years of waiting come to an end. A major theme of this chapter is exactly who gives the gift of children: God, and God alone. Personal schemes (Genesis 30:1–3), plants (Genesis 30:14–17), and even striped sticks (Genesis 30:37–43) are irrelevant, since it's God who holds the real power. Now, God "remembers" Rachel, a phrase which refers to God's favorable consideration. He opens her womb. The Bible is consistent from start to finish in teaching that God is the creator of life and the giver of children in all cases, but this teaching is a particular focus in the lives of Israel's early ancestors.