Genesis 19:8 Parallel Verses [⇓ See commentary ⇓]

Genesis 19:8, NIV: "Look, I have two daughters who have never slept with a man. Let me bring them out to you, and you can do what you like with them. But don't do anything to these men, for they have come under the protection of my roof.'"

Genesis 19:8, ESV: "Behold, I have two daughters who have not known any man. Let me bring them out to you, and do to them as you please. Only do nothing to these men, for they have come under the shelter of my roof.”"

Genesis 19:8, KJV: "Behold now, I have two daughters which have not known man; let me, I pray you, bring them out unto you, and do ye to them as is good in your eyes: only unto these men do nothing; for therefore came they under the shadow of my roof."

Genesis 19:8, NASB: "'Now behold, I have two daughters who have not had relations with man; please let me bring them out to you, and do to them whatever you like; only do nothing to these men, inasmuch as they have come under the shelter of my roof.'"

Genesis 19:8, NLT: "Look, I have two virgin daughters. Let me bring them out to you, and you can do with them as you wish. But please, leave these men alone, for they are my guests and are under my protection.'"

Genesis 19:8, CSB: "Look, I've got two daughters who haven't been intimate with a man. I'll bring them out to you, and you can do whatever you want to them. However, don't do anything to these men, because they have come under the protection of my roof.""

What does Genesis 19:8 mean? [⇑ See verse text ⇑]

The text does not explicitly say if Lot knows that the two men he is protecting are actually angels in human disguise. Based on his protective treatment of them, it's safe to assume Lot does not yet realize he is sheltering creatures who fear no human being. On the other hand, if Lot does think these are holy visitors sent from God, it might help us to comprehend the baffling suggestion he makes in this verse.

After begging the violent, corrupted men of his city not to follow through on their threat to rape his guests, Lot offers them his own virgin daughters to do with as they will, as an alternative. Suddenly, Lot doesn't seem to be such a righteous man. Even assuming that Lot is speaking in the typical, overstated style of ancient middle-eastern hospitality, this seems to be a ghastly suggestion. Maybe Lot is simply trying to demonstrate how evil the mob's demands are. Perhaps, if Lot really believes the men he is sheltering are messengers of God, he fears such an act will bring down immediate annihilation from God.

Then again, it must be said that this offer is consistent with Lot's character. Lot has remained "righteous" in the sense that he is not participating in the wickedness that every other man in his city embraces. He seems to be a kind, generous, and hospitable man. However, Lot hasn't moved his family away from the wicked influences of Sodom. For whatever reason, wealthy Lot has continued to make the choice, year after year, to raise his family there. In a sense, as the leader of his home, he has been sacrificing his family to the influence of Sodom for quite some time, fully of aware of the depths of depravity all around them. As we'll see in the following verses, Lot is even preparing to marry his daughters to a couple of the wicked men of the city.

So, while the idea that Lot would offer his daughters seems appalling, Lot has already, in some sense, given his family over to the Sodomite culture.