Titus 1:4 Parallel Verses [⇓ See commentary ⇓]

Titus 1:4, NIV: "To Titus, my true son in our common faith: Grace and peace from God the Father and Christ Jesus our Savior."

Titus 1:4, ESV: "To Titus, my true child in a common faith: Grace and peace from God the Father and Christ Jesus our Savior."

Titus 1:4, KJV: "To Titus, mine own son after the common faith: Grace, mercy, and peace, from God the Father and the Lord Jesus Christ our Saviour."

Titus 1:4, NASB: "To Titus, my true son in a common faith: Grace and peace from God the Father and Christ Jesus our Savior."

Titus 1:4, NLT: "I am writing to Titus, my true son in the faith that we share. May God the Father and Christ Jesus our Savior give you grace and peace."

Titus 1:4, CSB: "To Titus, my true son in our common faith. Grace and peace from God the Father and Christ Jesus our Savior."

What does Titus 1:4 mean? [⇑ See verse text ⇑]

Verse 4 transitions from a focus on Paul to the recipient: "Titus, my true child in a common faith." Three attributes are noted. First, Titus was a "true child" to Paul. This likely indicates that Titus had been converted by Paul. Second, they shared a faith in Jesus Christ as the Messiah. They both lived with the belief that Jesus was the way, the truth, and the life (John 14:6).

Third, their faith was not only "shared," but "common." This term is significant. Paul again stresses the unity of Christians, despite the fact that Paul was Jewish, and Titus was a Gentile. The entire letter emphasizes the problems associated with Judaizers—those who taught Christians were to live according to Jewish laws. Paul clearly noted in the introduction that he and Titus shared a common faith. They were a spiritual family, regardless of the divisions historically seen between Jews and Gentiles. They were family as a result of the person and work of Jesus the Messiah.

The reference to grace and peace is common in Paul's letter introductions. "Grace and peace" emphasizes Paul's blessing to Titus, while these two terms stood in parallel to God the Father and Christ Jesus our Savior. "Savior" ends both verses 3 and 4, with "God our Savior" in verse 3 and "Christ Jesus our Savior" in verse 4. Jesus was clearly presented as equal to God the Father and part of the triune Godhead.