Judges 6:24 Parallel Verses [⇓ See commentary ⇓]

Judges 6:24, NIV: So Gideon built an altar to the LORD there and called it The LORD Is Peace. To this day it stands in Ophrah of the Abiezrites.

Judges 6:24, ESV: Then Gideon built an altar there to the LORD and called it, The LORD Is Peace. To this day it still stands at Ophrah, which belongs to the Abiezrites.

Judges 6:24, KJV: Then Gideon built an altar there unto the LORD, and called it Jehovahshalom: unto this day it is yet in Ophrah of the Abiezrites.

Judges 6:24, NASB: Then Gideon built an altar there to the LORD and named it The LORD is Peace. To this day it is still in Ophrah of the Abiezrites.

Judges 6:24, NLT: And Gideon built an altar to the LORD there and named it Yahweh-Shalom (which means 'the LORD is peace'). The altar remains in Ophrah in the land of the clan of Abiezer to this day.

Judges 6:24, CSB: So Gideon built an altar to the Lord there and called it The Lord Is Peace. It is still in Ophrah of the Abiezrites today.

What does Judges 6:24 mean? [⇑ See verse text ⇑]

Gideon had made a meal as a test. He had generously provided an angelic stranger with food to see if the Man would give him a sign to prove He was the Lord. The Angel caused the meal, set on a rock, to be consumed by fire, and then He vanished from view (Judges 6:17–21). On the positive side, this convinced Gideon that the divine command to rescue Israel was legitimate (Judges 6:11–16). On the other hand, it inspired fear, as Gideon worried he'd be struck dead for seeing God's face (Judges 6:22–23). The Lord dispelled that fear, and now Gideon must move forward.

First, the newly-called judge (Judges 2:16–19) does as many Old Testament figures did after an encounter with God: he builds an altar and names it (Genesis 8:20; 22:14 26:25; 35:7; Exodus 17:15). He called this altar under a terebinth tree "The Lord is Peace." Perhaps the name comes from God's reassuring words to Gideon in the previous verse.

At the time the writer of Judges put together this manuscript, that altar was still standing. Scholars differ on their views of who this author is, but many point to Samuel: the last judge and first prophet of Israel's monarchy (1 Samuel 3:20; 7:3–6). The location of Ophrah is no longer known, but it was likely found within the territory of Manasseh (Joshua 17:7–10; Judges 6:15).