Judges 6:19 Parallel Verses [⇓ See commentary ⇓]

Judges 6:19, NIV: Gideon went inside, prepared a young goat, and from an ephah of flour he made bread without yeast. Putting the meat in a basket and its broth in a pot, he brought them out and offered them to him under the oak.

Judges 6:19, ESV: So Gideon went into his house and prepared a young goat and unleavened cakes from an ephah of flour. The meat he put in a basket, and the broth he put in a pot, and brought them to him under the terebinth and presented them.

Judges 6:19, KJV: And Gideon went in, and made ready a kid, and unleavened cakes of an ephah of flour: the flesh he put in a basket, and he put the broth in a pot, and brought it out unto him under the oak, and presented it.

Judges 6:19, NASB: Then Gideon went in and prepared a young goat and unleavened bread from an ephah of flour; he put the meat in a basket and the broth in a pot, and brought them out to him under the oak and presented them.

Judges 6:19, NLT: Gideon hurried home. He cooked a young goat, and with a basket of flour he baked some bread without yeast. Then, carrying the meat in a basket and the broth in a pot, he brought them out and presented them to the angel, who was under the great tree.

Judges 6:19, CSB: So Gideon went and prepared a young goat and unleavened bread from a half bushel of flour. He placed the meat in a basket and the broth in a pot. He brought them out and offered them to him under the oak.

What does Judges 6:19 mean? [⇑ See verse text ⇑]

Gideon has been commanded by the Lord to save Israel from the Midianites (Judges 6:11–16). No specific actions have been mentioned. The Lord has merely promised only to be with Gideon, describing His presence as Gideon's might. Since the Person speaking looks like a normal man, Gideon has asked for a sign to prove this is really the Lord. The Lord has graciously agreed to wait under the terebinth tree while Gideon prepares a gift for Him.

Gideon's gift turns out to be a large and generous meal, which he carefully prepares himself. He slaughters and cooks a young goat and makes unleavened cakes from a relatively large quantity of flour. Gideon puts the meat in a basket, the broth to pour over the meat in a pot, and delivers the meal to the stranger waiting for him under the tree. The size and quality of the food expresses both hospitality and respect. It also anticipates that the Man will do something to show He is the Lord, if He truly is. Scripture is not clear about what exactly Gideon is expecting to see.

If Gideon meant to directly worship the Angel as the Lord God, he may have brought the goat and slaughtered it in front of the Man before putting the meat on an altar. He doesn't do that. Still, this meal may have been intended a kind of spiritually laden sacrifice. This gift was described in the previous verse using the Hebrew term used for sacrifices. Given the fear with which Gideon was hiding food from the enemy (Judges 6:1–4, 11), it also may have represented a legitimate material sacrifice on Gideon's part.