Hebrews 7:28 Parallel Verses [⇓ See commentary ⇓]

Hebrews 7:28, NIV: For the law appoints as high priests men in all their weakness; but the oath, which came after the law, appointed the Son, who has been made perfect forever.

Hebrews 7:28, ESV: For the law appoints men in their weakness as high priests, but the word of the oath, which came later than the law, appoints a Son who has been made perfect forever.

Hebrews 7:28, KJV: For the law maketh men high priests which have infirmity; but the word of the oath, which was since the law, maketh the Son, who is consecrated for evermore.

Hebrews 7:28, NASB: For the Law appoints men as high priests who are weak, but the word of the oath, which came after the Law, appoints a Son, who has been made perfect forever.

Hebrews 7:28, NLT: The law appointed high priests who were limited by human weakness. But after the law was given, God appointed his Son with an oath, and his Son has been made the perfect High Priest forever.

Hebrews 7:28, CSB: For the law appoints as high priests men who are weak, but the promise of the oath, which came after the law, appoints a Son, who has been perfected forever.

What does Hebrews 7:28 mean? [⇑ See verse text ⇑]

This verse summarizes the conclusion of the author's argument: high priests of the Old Testament were flawed, but appointed by the God-given Law to serve their purpose (Galatians 3:19—4:6). Jesus, on the other hand, is perfect. In the book of Hebrews, the word perfect is most often a reference to something being completed (Hebrews 5:9). Here, however, the context includes the idea of Christ's sinlessness and moral perfection (Hebrews 4:15). Jesus has been appointed to His position directly by God (Hebrews 7:17, 21), unlike Levitical priests who inherit their titles (Hebrews 7:20). Jesus lives forever (Hebrews 7:16), and does not lose His priesthood to death as mortal priests will (Hebrews 7:23). Human efforts will be incomplete (Hebrews 7:18–19), but Jesus' efforts remove our sin completely (Hebrews 7:25).

In the next chapter, the author will build from his last two ideas. These were the idea of Melchizedek being greater than Abraham, and the priesthood of Jesus—on the order of Melchizedek—being greater than that of the Levitical priests. These will be the springboard to a deeper discussion of how, and why, Jesus' role in our salvation is exactly what God has always been promising us. The Old Covenant, while flawed, is not a mistake or a failure by God. It is simply part—and only part—of His overall plan.