Hebrews 6:2 Parallel Verses [⇓ See commentary ⇓]

Hebrews 6:2, NIV: instruction about cleansing rites, the laying on of hands, the resurrection of the dead, and eternal judgment.

Hebrews 6:2, ESV: and of instruction about washings, the laying on of hands, the resurrection of the dead, and eternal judgment.

Hebrews 6:2, KJV: Of the doctrine of baptisms, and of laying on of hands, and of resurrection of the dead, and of eternal judgment.

Hebrews 6:2, NASB: of instruction about washings and laying on of hands, and about the resurrection of the dead and eternal judgment.

Hebrews 6:2, NLT: You don't need further instruction about baptisms, the laying on of hands, the resurrection of the dead, and eternal judgment.

Hebrews 6:2, CSB: teaching about ritual washings, laying on of hands, the resurrection of the dead, and eternal judgment.

What does Hebrews 6:2 mean? [⇑ See verse text ⇑]

The early verses of chapter 6 explain how the author intends to handle the readers' spiritual immaturity. Rather than moving on to mature faith, these early Jewish Christians were stuck in a rut. The dangers of this will be explained in the next few verses. For now, however, the author makes it clear that there is no value in re-teaching the basics. Moving forward is the only reasonable option, so that is exactly what the book of Hebrews will do.

The need to press on is key for interpreting verses 4 through 8. The danger presented in those words is tied to the problem explained in chapter 5, and addressed here. Spiritual immaturity leads to consequences which we do well to avoid.

Verses 1 and 2 contain references to several doctrines. These would have been considered basic, in the time Hebrews was written. They were also concepts which Judaism and Christianity interpreted differently. More than likely, these were areas where persecuted Jewish Christians were being pressured to return to Judaism. The purpose of spelling these out seems to have two purposes. First, to emphasize that these are only the beginning of one's understanding of the faith. Second, that pressure from the outside world should not undermine our commitment to the truth.

A major theme of the conflict between early Christianity and Judaism was the purpose of ritual works. As men like Paul often stated, these were only meant to point the way to Christ (Galatians 3:24). They were never intended to be the final word on our relationship to God. For the Christian, this concept needs to be well-understood, and not subject to doubt. To take a step backwards, once again placing faith in these sacraments, would make it that much harder for a Christian to fully comprehend their own salvation.