Hebrews 11:26 Parallel Verses [⇓ See commentary ⇓]

Hebrews 11:26, NIV: He regarded disgrace for the sake of Christ as of greater value than the treasures of Egypt, because he was looking ahead to his reward.

Hebrews 11:26, ESV: He considered the reproach of Christ greater wealth than the treasures of Egypt, for he was looking to the reward.

Hebrews 11:26, KJV: Esteeming the reproach of Christ greater riches than the treasures in Egypt: for he had respect unto the recompence of the reward.

Hebrews 11:26, NASB: considering the reproach of Christ greater riches than the treasures of Egypt; for he was looking to the reward.

Hebrews 11:26, NLT: He thought it was better to suffer for the sake of Christ than to own the treasures of Egypt, for he was looking ahead to his great reward.

Hebrews 11:26, CSB: For he considered reproach for the sake of Christ to be greater wealth than the treasures of Egypt, since he was looking ahead to the reward.

What does Hebrews 11:26 mean? [⇑ See verse text ⇑]

According to this part of the book of Hebrews, the Old Testament is filled with examples of true, godly faith. That faith is not blind, but is instead based on knowledge of God (Hebrews 11:1–3). That knowledge should lead us to obedient, trusting, forward-looking faith, even when we do not see all of the details. The examples given in this most recent section include moments of extreme, personal, immediate choice. Among these are Abraham's obedience to God regarding Isaac (Hebrews 11:17–19), and Moses' parents' disobedience of an evil law (Hebrews 11:23). Moses also exhibited this kind of faith, by choosing to be counted among the people of Israel, instead of among his adoptive family in the Egyptian palace (Hebrews 11:23–25).

Earlier verses credited men like Abraham with a faith which looked ahead, not merely into their own lives, but to God's ultimate plan for humanity (Hebrews 11:10–16). Moses, as recorded here, seems to have had this same perspective. Popular depictions of Moses often suggest that he did not know about his Jewish heritage—the Bible says otherwise. On the contrary, as a well-educated member of Pharaoh's household, Moses likely knew more about Israel's history and the promises of God than many of his peers.

That knowledge seems to have led Moses to prefer his Hebrew people over the culture of Egypt. Instead of remaining in his palace, taking on the lavish lifestyle of an Egyptian noble, Moses considered the promises God had made to Israel more valuable, and chose to identify with them, instead (Exodus 2:1–10).

This verse also makes reference to Moses bearing the "reproach of Christ." Christ is a title, derived from the Greek christos, which is used to translate the Hebrew word meshiach, from which we also get the term messiah. Moses' identification with the people of Israel, then, is tied to the same faith spoken of in the rest of this passage. Namely, a faith in God's overall, eternal plan, including His Promised One. Moses chose to favor the "reproach of Christ," by identifying with God's chosen people before the earthly birth Jesus Christ, foreshadowing those who would bear the "reproach of Christ," after Jesus' earthly ministry.