Hebrews 10:29 Parallel Verses [⇓ See commentary ⇓]

Hebrews 10:29, NIV: How much more severely do you think someone deserves to be punished who has trampled the Son of God underfoot, who has treated as an unholy thing the blood of the covenant that sanctified them, and who has insulted the Spirit of grace?

Hebrews 10:29, ESV: How much worse punishment, do you think, will be deserved by the one who has trampled underfoot the Son of God, and has profaned the blood of the covenant by which he was sanctified, and has outraged the Spirit of grace?

Hebrews 10:29, KJV: Of how much sorer punishment, suppose ye, shall he be thought worthy, who hath trodden under foot the Son of God, and hath counted the blood of the covenant, wherewith he was sanctified, an unholy thing, and hath done despite unto the Spirit of grace?

Hebrews 10:29, NASB: How much more severe punishment do you think he will deserve who has trampled underfoot the Son of God, and has regarded as unclean the blood of the covenant by which he was sanctified, and has insulted the Spirit of grace?

Hebrews 10:29, NLT: Just think how much worse the punishment will be for those who have trampled on the Son of God, and have treated the blood of the covenant, which made us holy, as if it were common and unholy, and have insulted and disdained the Holy Spirit who brings God's mercy to us.

Hebrews 10:29, CSB: How much worse punishment do you think one will deserve who has trampled on the Son of God, who has regarded as profane the blood of the covenant by which he was sanctified, and who has insulted the Spirit of grace?

What does Hebrews 10:29 mean? [⇑ See verse text ⇑]

Under the old covenant, those who intentionally rebelled against God's law were subject to the death penalty (Numbers 15:27–31). So far, the book of Hebrews has explained in great detail how the new covenant is superior to the old covenant. It is composed of a greater promise (Hebrews 8:6), performed by a greater priest (Hebrews 7:28), enacted in greater places (Hebrews 9:24), and uses a greater sacrifice (Hebrews 9:12–14). Since the new covenant is far superior to the old, it follows logically that those who intentionally violate the new covenant would be subject to significantly more dire consequences.

Earlier, the writer spoke of those who "go on sinning deliberately after receiving the knowledge of the truth" (Hebrews 10:26). Some interpret this as a reference to people who have clear, obvious understanding of the gospel, but choose to reject it anyway. The more likely interpretation, especially in light of this verse, is that this is a warning to Christian believers, similar to the ones given in chapters 3 (Hebrews 3:12–19) and 6 (Hebrews 6:1–8). This verse specifically refers to the offending party as one who "was sanctified" under the blood of the new covenant. The context of the New Testament, and the book of Hebrews, indicates that salvation cannot be lost (John 10:28–29). These are not Christians falling from grace into damnation; rather, these are believers failing to obey and suffering the consequences.

Chapter 6 warned about the consequences of falling into doubt and disbelief. This included a reference to fire, as a symbol of God's judgment (Hebrews 6:8). Verse 27 gave that theme an even more dramatic description. God brought earthly judgment against His chosen people in the Old Testament. Their suffering was all the more severe since they, of all people on earth, knew better and should have obeyed. Christians who fall into doubt, disbelief, or disobedience, in the same sense, are subject to "much worse punishment" from God, since they ought to know better.