Genesis 8:4 Parallel Verses [⇓ See commentary ⇓]

Genesis 8:4, NIV: "and on the seventeenth day of the seventh month the ark came to rest on the mountains of Ararat."

Genesis 8:4, ESV: "and in the seventh month, on the seventeenth day of the month, the ark came to rest on the mountains of Ararat."

Genesis 8:4, KJV: "And the ark rested in the seventh month, on the seventeenth day of the month, upon the mountains of Ararat."

Genesis 8:4, NASB: "Then in the seventh month, on the seventeenth day of the month, the ark rested upon the mountains of Ararat."

Genesis 8:4, NLT: "exactly five months from the time the flood began, the boat came to rest on the mountains of Ararat."

Genesis 8:4, CSB: "The ark came to rest in the seventh month, on the seventeenth day of the month, on the mountains of Ararat."

What does Genesis 8:4 mean? [⇑ See verse text ⇑]

Once again, Genesis gives us a specific date in the history of the world upon which a major event occurred. The first one was given in Genesis 7:11 on the day the rains came. That was in the 600th year of Noah's life on the seventeenth day of the second month. Now the ark comes to rest on the mountains of Ararat on the seventeenth day of the seventh month. That makes five Old Testament months, or 150 days.

Why does this matter? The writer means to show us that the flood was a genuine historical event marked by actual dates on the calendar. The writer of this passage does not intend this event to be seen as a myth, a spiritual metaphor, or a parable. The intent is to present actual, physical history. These dates also would become a way of measuring time after the flood in the era following Noah's life.

In addition, the writer means for us to see that the ark of Noah came to rest in a real geographical place in the world: the mountains of a region called Ararat. Genesis's first readers probably new that area as being north of Assyria, later known as Armenia. This is likely the same region we know as being in eastern Turkey, southern Russia, and northwestern Iran.

Though many have speculated and even searched for the ark, the text does not give a specific location for its resting place. There is no reason to think it would have survived until now. Any wood on board would have been extremely valuable for building and for fuel, and unlikely to survive several thousand years.