Genesis 8:1 Parallel Verses [⇓ See commentary ⇓]

Genesis 8:1, NIV: "But God remembered Noah and all the wild animals and the livestock that were with him in the ark, and he sent a wind over the earth, and the waters receded."

Genesis 8:1, ESV: "But God remembered Noah and all the beasts and all the livestock that were with him in the ark. And God made a wind blow over the earth, and the waters subsided."

Genesis 8:1, KJV: "And God remembered Noah, and every living thing, and all the cattle that was with him in the ark: and God made a wind to pass over the earth, and the waters asswaged;"

Genesis 8:1, NASB: "But God remembered Noah and all the animals and all the livestock that were with him in the ark; and God caused a wind to pass over the earth, and the water subsided."

Genesis 8:1, NLT: "But God remembered Noah and all the wild animals and livestock with him in the boat. He sent a wind to blow across the earth, and the floodwaters began to recede."

Genesis 8:1, CSB: "God remembered Noah, as well as all the wildlife and all the livestock that were with him in the ark. God caused a wind to pass over the earth, and the water began to subside."

What does Genesis 8:1 mean? [⇑ See verse text ⇑]

After the global destruction of chapter 7, Genesis 8 begins with a comforting statement: God "remembered" Noah. This does not imply that God "forgot" Noah for a while. Rather, the idea is that Noah was always in God's sight, and in His mind. In addition, God was thinking of the animals that were with Noah on the ark. The same God who wiped out all of humanity and every kind of animal in judgment against the violence on the earth now turns and treats those He has saved with compassion and care.

God starts the process of removing the floodwaters from the earth. While the heaviest rains occurred in the first 40 days (Genesis 7:12), the next verse leaves open the possibility that lighter, less destructive rain has been falling since then (Genesis 8:2). In the upcoming verses, all the water will finally stop. God also causes a great wind to spring up and begin to evaporate the waters.